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    Relationships are a big part of reason that NYPL's BridgeUp after-school program works for Matthew. When he gets to the Bronx Library Center, he gets a snack, checks in with his mentors and friends, does homework, and gets to spend time on personal projects, including his electric skateboard. He says the program has a "great positive vibe" and is motivating him to greater academic success.

    Library Stories is a video series from The New York Public Library that shows what the Library means to our users, staff, donors, and communities through moving personal interviews.

    Like, share, and watch more Library Stories on Facebook or YouTube.

    Matthew Anderson, BridgeUp student at Bronx Library Center

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    In 2016, the New York City Labor Market Information Service, Center for Urban Research (CUNY) released Career Map: Tech Support and Beyond,  with support from Kingsborough  Community College.

    Technology is everywhere and so are tech jobs.  With virtually everyone using computers, smartphones, tablets and other devices, demand continues to rise for people who  can answer user questions and make sure that everything is operating smoothly.  Career Map: Tech Support  and Beyond explores actual  career progressions of people 5 to 10 years and 10 to 15 years after starting out as an IT Support Specialist/ Technician, Desktop Support Technician, Help Desk Analyst, or in any other general entry level tech support position.

    Jobs in tech support  vary by the type of job and from employer to employer.  UsuallyLMIS, the Help Desk  function is tiered, with people at higher tiers handling more complicated problems.  With more experience, education, and certifications, tech support professionals can move from entry-level jobs such as HELP DESK TIER, DESKTOP SUPPORT or IT SPECIALIST to other jobs on this career map.

    This career map is based on the real experience of actual people.  The information comes from real online work histories of people who have worked in tech support in the New York City Metroplolitan Area.  Payscale, Inc. and Monster Government Solutions supplied this data.

    NETWORK AND COMPUTER SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR

    Computer networks connect devices such as computers, smartphones, and printers. Network administrators manage the day-to-day operation of these networks. They make sure that email and data storage networks work properly. They help make decisions about buying new hardware and software for their organization’s network. People who work in these jobs are a critical part of almost every organization. Popular certifications include: Network+, CCNA, and MCSE. 

    PROJECT MANAGER

    There are many types of project managers. Some plan and manage IT projects like network design, while others may oversee software projects. They serve as a liaison between business and technical aspects of projects. They make sure that deadlines, standards, and cost targets are met. The most popular certification for this job is Project Management Professional (PMP).

    COMPUTER AND INFORMATION  SYSTEM MANAGER 

    People in these jobs plan, direct or coordinate activities in technology fields. They help determine the IT goals of an organization and are responsible for implementing computer systems to meet these goals. People in these jobs often work more than 40 hours per week and are “on call” in case of IT emergencies. 

    COMPUTER  SYSTEM ANALYST   

    People in this role bring business and technology together. They understand the needs of users and potential problems. They may adapt computer systems to serve new purposes or improve work flow. People in these jobs may have backgrounds in technology and business administration. Many people have experience working in a specific industry like advertising, health care, or finance. 

    GENERAL AND OPERATIONS MANAGER

    Some people move out of specializing only in IT. They oversee larger parts of an organization. People in these jobs plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of public or private sector organizations. They may be responsible for technology as well as other functions.

    In addition to jobs in tech support, there are many other types of tech jobs.  Most of these jobs have to do with creating and managing software, which may also be known as computer programming.  Learn about major types of software jobs.


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     Michael Chabon and Richard Price
    LIVE from the NYPL: Michael Chabon and Richard Price

    Welcome to our biweekly update on events happening during the next two weeks at the Library. With 92 locations across New York City, a lot is happening at The New York Public Library. We're highlighting some of our events—including author talks, free classes, community art shows, performances, concerts, and exhibitions—and you can always find more at nypl.org/events. If you want our round-up in your inbox, sign up here. We look forward to seeing you at the Library.

    Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

    LIVE from the NYPL

    11/29: Tom Wolfe: The author of a dozen books, including the contemporary classicsThe Bonfire of the Vanities and The Right Stuff, comes to the LIVE stage to discuss his seminal work The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, which unleashed the literary genre of New Journalism. Celeste Bartos Forum, 7 PM.

    12/7: Michael Chabon and Richard Price: Two icons of literary fiction come together at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building to discuss Michael Chabon's acclaimed new novel, Moonglow, the sweeping story of a deathbed confessional based on Chabon's experiences with his own grandfather. Celeste Bartos Forum, 7 PM.

     Folding the Frame
    Hélio Oiticica: Folding the Frame

    Free Events at The Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

    11/30: Hélio Oiticaca: Folding the FrameOn the occasion of the publication of Hélio Oiticaca: Folding the Frame, author Irene V. Small discusses the artwork of one of Brazil's foremost visual artists of the 60s and 70s with award-winning art historian Molly Nesbit. Berger Forum, 6 PM

    11/30: Electric Earth with Doug Aitken and Philippe Vergne: To celebrate the publication of his new catalog, Electric Earth, multi-disciplinary artist and filmmaker Doug Aitken discusses his varied body of work in architecture, sculpture, land art, and sound art with Philippe Vergne, Director of The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. Celeste Auditorium, 6 PM.

    12/6: Austerity Blues: Fighting for the Soul of Public Higher Education: In this talk, author and scholar Stephen Brier explores the decline of public higher education since the 1980s, and how online learning, privatization, politics, and disinvestment have driven deepening inequality among students and faculty. Berger Forum, 6 PM.

    12/7: The Psychological Portrait: Unknown Portraits of Einstein, Roosevelt, Frida Kahlo, and Others: Join us for a presentation of the portraiture of Dr. Marcel Sternberger, who interviewed his subjects while photographing them to produce unique and powerful portraits of famous figures. Berger Forum, 6 PM.

    12/13: Our Compelling Interests: A Panel on Diversity and Democracy: The new book series Our Compelling Interests sheds light on how America's differences are crucial to its success in an era of swift transformation across the country. Featuring series co-editor Earl Lewis, Incoming Director of the Schomburg Center Kevin Young, and a panel discussion with Nancy Cantor, Maria Contreras-Sweet, Nicole Gelinas, Sherrilyn Ifill, and NYPL President Tony Marx. 6:30 PM, Celeste Auditorium.

     Jamel Shabazz and Akintola Hanif (photo by Jamel Shabazz)
    Visually Speaking: Jamel Shabazz and Akintola Hanif (photo by Jamel Shabazz)

    The Schomburg Center

    12/1: Conversations in Black Freedom Studies: Honoring the Legacy of Black Woman Radicals: Black women who were at the forefront of the Black Revolt in the 1960s have been omitted from history books, but two scholars come to The Schomburg Center to uncover the stories of two radicals: Mae Mallory and Gloria Richardson. The Schomburg Center, 6 PM.

    12/2: First Fridays: Black Tie "Holiday" Edition: For this edition of The Schomburg Center's popular monthly social gathering, celebrate the holidays at a cocktail affair with hors d'oeurves by The Seasoned Pot and a DJ set by DJ Sylk. The Schomburg Center, 6 PM.

    12/7: Lapidus Center Presents: Banjo Stories and Songs from Haiti & New Orleans: Laurent Dubois talks about his new book, The Banjo: America's African Instrument, an illuminating biography of the banjo and its place in black culture on Caribbean and North American plantations. Dubois will be joined by singer and banjo, guitar, and cello player Leyla McCalla. The Schomburg Center, 6:30 PM

    12/8: Visually Speaking: Jamel Shabazz and Akintola Hanif: Brooklyn-born Jamel Shabazz has been capturing New York life since he was 15 years old, photographing peers, members of the local mosque, elders in their Sunday best, and families. He discusses his work with photojournalist, curator, and filmmaker Akintola Hanif. The Schomburg Center, 6:30 PM.

    (I)MAGESOUND(S)
    (I)MAGESOUND(S)

    The Library for the Performing Arts

    12/1: (I)MAGESOUND(S)(I)MAGESOUND(S) brings together Jim Hobbs, Dennis McNany, and Andrew Hill, who will explore and exploit the potential of sonic influences on the moving image and vice versa. Working across various approaches from single screen films and rescored archival footage, to more complex expanded cinema and sonic installations, the entire program celebrates the collaborative nature of artists and the resonance of sound and image. Bruno Walter Auditorium, 6 PM.

    12/3 and 12/5: Mame!: Gotham Radio Theatre returns after their SRO performance of Ellery Queen with another classic character, Auntie Mame. Gotham's production of Mame! will include a live orchestra using music from the period. Bruno Walter Auditorium, 1:30 PM on 12/3 and 6 PM on 12/5.

    12/9: Holiday Hula Party: Join us at LPA for an interactive evening exploring the art of Hawaiian dance, led by Dara Faust, the shoe supervisor of the New York City Ballet. LPA Cafe, 7 PM.

    Mid-Manhattan Library

    12/3: Archive/Improv with Paul Sunday and Matthew Deleget: Artist and educator Paul Sunday joins artist, curator, and arts worker Matthew Deleget to discuss Sunday's new series of photographs, Archive/Improv, created specifically for his "Photo Walls in Picture Collection" exhibition. The Corner Room, 2:30 PM.

    12/7: Words on the Move: Why English Won't—and Can't—Sit Still (Like, Literally) with John McWhorter: Celebrated linguist and professor John McWhorter takes the audience on a lively tour of how the English language is evolving before our eyes, and argues why we should embrace transformation rather than fighting it. Mid-Manhattan Library, 6:30 PM.

    Science, Industry, and Business Library

    11/30: Building a Brand to Attract Employers: In this interactive presentation, Dr. Bruce Hurwitz of Hurwitz Strategic Staffing, Ltd., explains how he was able to build his brand and secure over 600 media citations and appear in 400 publications across the world. Conference Room 018, 6 PM.

    12/8: Family Business Part 1: Professionalizing Your Family BusinessWarner Babcock and Marcy Syms from the NYC Family Enterprise Center talk about professionalizing a family-owned business. Learn how to work more effectively with family members (inside and outside the family business), how to address challenges commonly associated with family businesses, how governance can help reduce risks, how to prepare for future growth and challenges, and much more. Conference Room 018, 6 PM.

    12/10: Municipal Bonds for Triple Tax Free Income: Individual investors buy municipal bonds for income exempt from federal, state, and local income tac. David Polevoy, CFP® discusses what you need to know to become a successful muni investor.

     The Prints of Henri-Charles Guérard
    Sept chats noirs, by Henri-Charles Guérard.

    Exhibition

    A Curious Hand: The Prints of Henri-Charles Guérard: Described by the influential nineteenth-century art critic Roger Marx as “the engraver of curiosity par excellence,” Henri-Charles Guérard was one of the most skilled and inventive French printmakers of his day. Édouard Manet turned to Guérard whenever he needed help making etchings, no doubt owing to Guérard’s expertise as a professional printmaker as well as to his innovative approach to the medium. Thanks to a generous gift from the art collector and connoisseur Samuel Putnam Avery (1822–1904), The New York Public Library has the largest collection of Guérard’s work in the United States. Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, 3rd Floor. Ends February 26th, 2017.

    Get Event Updates by Email 

    Want NYPL Now in your inbox? Sign up for our biweekly e-newsletter and get even more updates on what's happening at the Library. Plus, you can follow NYPL Events on Facebook or Twitter.

    More Events

    Note: Visit nypl.org/events or call ahead for the latest information, as programs and hours are subject to change or cancellation.

     


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    'Tis the season for suspense: bounty hunters, the Army, the F.B.I., the  C.I.A., forensics, and judicial corruption.  

    Turbo 23

    # Recommendations for readers who enjoyed Turbo Twenty-Three by Janet Evanovich, more upbeat, funny suspense: 

    What Looks Like Crazy by Charlotte Hughes

    The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz

    Swift Justice by Laura A.H. DiSilverio

     

     

     

    No Man's Land

    #2 Recommendations for readers who enjoyed No Man's Land by David Baldacci, more cold case suspense:

    Natchez Burning by Greg Iles

    The Bitter Season by Tami Hoag

    The Skeleton Road  by Val McDermid

     

     

     

    whistler

    #3 Recommendations for readers who enjoyed The Whistler by John Grisham, more legal thrillers set in Florida:

    Collateral Damage by H. Terrell Griffin

    The Pardon by James Grippando

    Bad Monkey by Carl Hiassen

     

     

     

    night school

    #4 Recommendations for readers who enjoyed Night School by Lee Child, more noir suspense:

    Red Station by Adrian Magson

    The Escape by David Baldacci

    Adrenaline by Jeff Abbott

     

     

     

    Chaos

    #5 Recommendations for readers who enjoyed Chaos by Patricia Cornwell, more forensic suspense: 

    The Bone Garden by Tess Gerritsen

    What Lies Behind by J.T. Ellison

    Now She's Gone by Gregg Olsen

     

     

     

    ---

    Have trouble reading standard print? Many of these titles are available in formats for patrons with print disabilities.

    Staff picks are chosen by NYPL staff members and are not intended to be comprehensive lists. We'd love to hear your ideas too, so leave a comment and tell us what you’d recommend. And check out our Staff Picks browse tool for more recommendations!


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    Enrollment Now Open: SAGEWorks Boot Camp on Monday 21 - Friday 25, 10- 11:30 am at The SAGE Center, 305 7th Ave. New York, NY 10001.    Registration required.  SAGEWorks assists people 40 years and older in learning relevant, cutting-edge job search skills in a LGBT-friendly environment.  This 2 week training takes place from Monday - Friday, 12/5/16 - 12/16/16 – 9:30 am to 2:00 pm.

    Dutch Express LLC will present a recruitment on Tuesday, November 29, 2016, 10 am - 2 pm for Delivery Associate - Driver (5 openings), Delivery Associate  - Box Truck  Driver (5 openings), Delivery Associate - Walker (5 openings) at Upper Manhattan Workforce 1 Career Center, 215 West 125th Street, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10027. 

    United Cerebral Palsy of New York City, Inc. will present a recruitment on Tuesday, November 29, 2016, 10 am - 12 pm,  and 2:00 pm -5:00 pm,  for Residence Program Specialist (5 openings), Certified Teacher Assistant (5 openings), at United Cerebral Palsy of New York City, Inc. , 80 Maiden Lane, 2nd Floor,New York, NY 10038.  RSVP by email.  Attend Open House/Recruitment.

    Job Postings at New York City Workforce 1.  Job Search Central

    Apprenticeship Opportunities in New York City.

    Brooklyn Community  Board 14: Available jobs

    The New York City Employment and Training Coalition (NYCE&TC) is an association of 200 community-based organizations, educational institutions, and labor unions that annually provide job training and employment services to over 750,000 New Yorkers, including welfare recipients, unemployed workers, low-wage workers, at-risk youth, the formerly incarcerated, immigrants and the mentally and physically disabled. View NYCE&TC Job Listings.

    Digital NYC is the official online hub of the New York City startup and technology ecosystem, bringing together every company, startup, investor, event, job, class, blog, video, workplace, accelerator, incubator, resource, and organization in the five boroughs. Search jobs by category on this site.

    St. Nicks Alliance Workforce Development provides Free Job Training and Educational Programs in Environmental Response and Remediation Tec (ERRT). Commercial Driver's License, Pest Control Technician Training (PCT), Employment Search and Prep Training and Job Placement, Earn Benefits and Career Path Center. For information and assistance, please visit St. Nicks Alliance Workforce Development or call 718-302-2057 ext. 202.

    Brooklyn Workforce Innovations helps jobless and working poor New Yorkers establish careers in sectors that offer good wages and opportunities for advancement. Currently, BWI offers free job training programs in four industries: commercial driving, telecommunications cable installation, TV and film production, and skilled woodworking.

    CMP (formerly Chinatown Manpower Project) in lower Manhattan is now recruiting for a free training in Quickbooks, Basic Accounting, and Excel. This training is open to anyone who is receiving food stamps but no cash assistance. Class runs for eight weeks, followed by one-on-one meetings with a job developer. CMP also provides Free Home Health Aide Training for bilingual English/Cantonese speakers who are receiving food stamps but no cash assistance. Training runs Mondays through Fridays for six weeks and includes test prep and taking the HHA certification exam. Students learn about direct care techniques such as taking vital signs and assisting with personal hygiene and nutrition. For more information for the above two training programs, email: info@cmpny.org, call 212-571-1690, or visit. CMP also provides tuition-based healthcare and business trainings free to students who are entitled to ACCESS funding.

    Nontraditional Employment for Women (NEW) trains women and places them in careers in the skilled construction, utility, and maintenance trades. It helps women achieve economic independence and a secure future. For information call 212-627-6252 or register online.

    Grace Institute provides tuition-free, practical job training in a supportive learning community for underserved New York area women of all ages and from many different backgrounds. For information call 212-832-7605.

    Please note this page will be revised when more recruitment events for the week of November 27  become available.

     

     

     

     

     

    driver (5 openings)


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    Searching for the perfect gift for a library lover? Look no further! Check out these gifts from our Library Shop.

    1. Neil Gaiman Tote Bag

    Neil Gaiman Tote Bag

    Fill this canvas bag from our Wise Words collection with dreams and still have space in the inner pocket for material things. Like your keys.

    Begin your literary journey.

    2. Mini Book Light

    Mini Book Light

    Read in any circumstance with this powerful LED lamp that can fit in your pocket. Did we mention it can charge your phone, too?

    Find your pocket-sized super book.

    3. Library Card Scarf​

    Library Card Scarf

    We’re all a little nostalgic for date stamps and paper library cards. Wear your happy memories with style in this cotton/silk scarf.

    Celebrate nostalgia.

    4. When in Doubt Tee

    When in Doubt Go to the Library T-Shirt

    Whether you’re a fan or looking for some sage advice, Hermione’s words ring true. Show that proudly with this 100% cotton shirt.

    For witches and wizards of all sorts.

    5. Library Stamp Desk Caddy

    Library Stamp Desk Caddy

    The stamp originated with The New York Public Library itself. The wood is reclaimed heart of pine. Your desk is infinitely cooler and a touch neater. You’re welcome.

    Treat yourself.

    6. Tequila Mockingbird

    Tequila Mockingbird

    Filled to the brim with literary references and puns (Gin Eyre anyone?), this cocktail book is the ideal chaser to a long day for those more liquidly inclined.

    Get your literary drink on.

    7. Card Catalog

    Card Catalog

    Invigorate To Do lists by writing them on the back of classics like Moby Dick. Then put them in the matching envelope and file away. Like a real card catalog!

    Spruce up your notecards.

    8. Due Date Tie

    Due Date Tie

    This silk tie transports you back to the time when library books had to be stamped by hand, marginalia roamed free, and the scent of books filled the air. (Scent of books not included.)

    But you can get the tie.

    9. Quote Magnet Set

    Quote Magnet Set

    Does that wall/fridge/lamp look a little bare? Is life lacking that certain dose of inspiration?

    Spruce it up with our Wise Words magnet set.

    10. Shakespeare Quote Necklace

    Shakespeare Necklace

    A gift for fierce ladies of all statures. That Hermia is sure to love the sterling silver quote and lion. (Reads: “Although she be but little, she is fierce.”)

    Get your bold necklace.

    11. Banned Books Bracelet

    Banned Books Bracelet

    This lead-free banned book bracelet is a perfect accessory for that librarian who wishes Banned Book Week could be every day of the year.

    Get some serious banned swag.

    12. Fran Lebowitz Quote Mug

    Fran Lebowitz Mug

    This 11 oz mug from our Wise Words collection provides some good advice and another reason to love books. (And it’s dishwasher and microwave safe, to boot.)

    Fill your head.

    13. Punk Rock Authors Tote

    Punk Rock Authors Tote

    Finally! A tote for the book lover with an attitude.

    Get yours today.

    14. Library Stamp Pouch

    Red Vintage Library Stamp Pouch

    Tote too big? Try a canvas pouch adorned with the vintage stamp once used at NYPL.

    Comes in Red (pictured), Light Denim (also pictured),Gray, Black, and Dark Denim, too!

    15. Raven Scarf

    Raven Scarf

    Share your darker side by wearing this cotton infinity scarf boasting the entire Poe poem. Soon enough, you’ll be looking at other scarves and saying “Nevermore!”

    Make Poe proud.

    16. Book Stack Earrings

    Book Stack Earrings

    Never be too far from a good book with these earrings.

    Available in Gold and Silver.

    Get your order in by December 14th to ensure arrival by Christannukah eve (December 24th).

    Get Shop Updates by Email

    Want 10% off your next order? Sign up for weekly e-newsletter to get exclusive offers and updates will go straight to your inbox. Plus, follow the NYPL Shop on Facebook and Twitter.


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    What are people reading around the world? Harry Potter and the Cursed Child and The Girl on the Train are still high on the bestseller lists in many countries, and on the nonfiction front we noticed that Bruce Springsteen's new memoir Born to Run is doing very well in Austria, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the United Kingdom, as well as here in the U.S. This month we took a close look at the bestseller lists in Canada, Dominican Republic, Israel, Portugal, and Turkey to see what fiction titles are popular with readers there. In most cases, we found a mix of local authors and international bestsellers like Paolo Coelho's latest, The Spy

    Canada

    Do Not Say We Have Nothing

    When we checked The Globe and Mail’s Hardcover Fiction Bestsellers list early last week, John Grisham’s latest, The Whistler, was at the top, followed by Night School by Lee Child, and the final installment in Jeffrey Archer’s Clifton Chronicles, This Was a Manwas number three. Canadian authors were in the fourth and fifth slots: Man Booker Prize nominee Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien and The Couple Next Door by Shari Lapena. All these titles are available in English at NYPL. Many other books by John Grisham are available in Spanish, Russian, and Polish, as well as a one or two in otgher languages, including Italian, Korean, Hebrew, Japanese.

    French Canadian authors dominated the French language bestseller list compiled by Les Libraries when we checked last week, with Harry Potter and the Cursed Child (Harry Potter et l'enfant maudit) and the recent Prix Goncourt winner also near the top. Conversations avec un enfant curieux by Michel Tremblay was in the top spot. Many of of Tremblay’s works are available in the original French in the Research Collections, as well as in English translation. L’autre reflet by Patrick Sénécal is the next fiction title on the list. Sénécal’s previous novels Faims is available to borrow in the original French, and the film 5150 Rue des Ormes / 5150 Elm's Way, Chanson doucebased on his novel of the same name, is also available. La femme qui fuit by Anaïs Barbeau-Lavalette was next on the list. This title is not currently available at the Library, but  Inch’allah, a 2013 film written and directed by the author is available at NYPL. Chanson Douce [Sweet Song] by Leïla Slimani, winner of this year’s Prix Goncourt was also high on the French Canadian bestseller list. Faber has acquired the English translation rights for the novel.
     
    A nonfiction note: The latest nonfiction comic from Guy Delisle, S'enfuir: récit d'un otage / Hostagewas also high on Les Libraries’s bestseller list. This is not currently available to borrow, but several of Delisle’s graphic travelogues are available in English translation: Jerusalem : Chronicles from the Holy City, Burma Chronicles, Pyongyang : A Journey in North Korea, and Shenzhen : A Travelogue from China.
     

    Dominican Republic

    La espia

    When we checked the bestseller lists on the Cuesta Libros website last week, The Spy / La espia, the latest novel by Brazilian author Paulo Coelho was at the top of the fiction list. NYPL currently has copies of to borrow in English and Spanish. Other books by Paulo Coelho are available to borrow in the original Portuguese, English, Spanish, Russian, Arabic, Polish, Korean, Italian, and one or two in French, Hebrew, Hungarian, German, and Albanian.

    Harry Potter and the Cursed Child /Harry Potter y el legado maldito was next on the list followed by Los herederos de la tierra[Heirs of the Earth] by Ildefonso Falcones, a sequel to the bestselling historical novel La catedral del mar / Cathedral of the Sea. This book has not been translated into English yet. Other novels by Falcones are currently available to borrow or download from NYPL in Spanish, English, Italian, and Hebrew.

    Cinco esquinas
    The most recent novel by renowned Peruvian writer Mario Vargas Llosa, Cinco Esquinas [Five Corners], was next on the top fiction list at Cuesta Libros. This novel is currently available to borrow in the original Spanish; it has not been translated into English yet. Many other books by the Nobel laureate are available to borrow in Spanish, English (translations by Edith Grossman), as well as some in Russian,  and one or two in Korean, Japanese, Chinese, Hebrew, and Polish.
     
    Paula Hawkins's international bestseller La Chica del Tren / The Girl on the Train completed the top five. The Girl on the Train is currently available to borrow from NYPL in EnglishSpanishRussianChineseFrenchPolishItalian, and Hebrew, and as an e-book in German.

    Israel

    One Plus One
    Fiction by Israeli authors tops the bestseller list at the online bookseller Steimatsky this week.Historical novels by Sara Aharoni, [Mrs. Rothschild’s Love] אהבתה של גברת רוטשילד, and Nurith Gertz, [An Ocean Between Us] ים ביני לבינך are numbers one and two with [The Clothes Whisperer] החיים ומה שלבשתי, a comic novel by Shelly Gross at number three.
     
    English language authors in translation round out the fiction bestseller list. One Plus One by JoJo Moyes is number four. This title is also available at NYPL in Spanish and Russian. Translations of other novels by Jojo Moyes are currently available to borrow in Russian, Spanish, Korean, Polish, and Italian. The thriller Black List by Brad Thor is also on the list, followed by The Silkworm, the second installment in Robert Galbraith’s Cormoran Strike series. Robert Galbraith’s novels are available to borrow in Spanish, Russian, Polish, Chinese, and Portuguese as well as in English.

    Portugal

    Two by two (POR)Portuguese authors and international bestsellers were both high on the bestseller list at Bertrand Livreiros when we looked last week. Two by Two / Só Nós Dois, the latest by Nicholas Sparks topped the fiction list. NYPL has a large selection of novels by Nicholas Sparks in Spanish and Russian, as well as some in Vietnamese, Italian, Polish, and Hebrew. Two by Two is currently available in English.
     
    One of Portugal’s most popular writers, José Rodrigues dos Santos, was next on the list with his latest thriller, Vaticanum [Vatican]. Some of dos Santos’s earlier thrillers are available to
    Police
    borrow from the Library in Spanish, and Fórmula de Deus / Formule de Dieu / The Einstein Enigma is available in French. The original Portuguese versions of Dos Santos’s novels and some English translations are available in the Research Collections. Portuguese writer Raul Minh'alma was also in the top five with Larga quem não te agarra [Let go of the ones that don’t grab you]. Minh’alma’s work is not available in English.
     
    Other books in the fiction top ten include The Girl on the Train / A Rapariga no Comboio by Paula Hawkins, My Brilliant Friend / A Amiga Genial by Elena Ferrante, Jackdaws / Nome de Código: Leoparda by Ken Follett, and Police / Policia, Jo Nesbo’s 10th Harry Hole mystery. Police is available to borrow in English, Russian, Spanish, and Polish. The library has other titles by Jo Nesbo in Italian, Korean. Books by Ken Follett are available to borrow in Spanish, Russian, Chinese, as well as in EnglishMy Brilliant Friend  is currently available to borrow in the original Italian, in EnglishFrenchSpanish, and Polish.

     

    Turkey

    Madonna in a fur coatWe looked at the bestsellers at two of Turkey’s largest online booksellers last week,  D & R and Idefix. Some titles in translation that appeared on both lists were The Spy / Casus by Paolo Coelho, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child / Harry Potter ve Lanetli Çocuk, and George Orwell’s 1984. NYPL currently has copies of 1984 to borrow in English, Spanish, Russian, Polish, and Arabic. Müptezeller [Mistakes] the latest novel by Turkish writer Emrah Serbes was also high on the bestseller lists at both booksellers. One of Serbes’s novels, The King of Taksim Square / Deliduman has been translated into English.
     
    An interesting title on Turkey’s bestseller lists is Madonna in a Fur Coat / Kürk Mantolu Madonna by Sabahattin Ali, first published in 1943 and translated into English in 2016. In May of this year translator Maureen Freely wrote in The Guardian that “for the past three years, it has topped the bestseller lists in Turkey, outselling Orhan Pamuk. It is read, loved and wept over by men and women of all ages, but most of all by young adults. And no one seems able to explain quite why.”
     
     In May we checked the fiction bestseller lists in Germany, Italy, Brazil, Argentina, and Russia, and in July we looked at bestseller lists from France, Mexico, Singapore, South Korea, and Sweden. September took us to China, Nigeria, Poland, Spain, and the United Arab Emirates. Do you check the bestseller lists from any other countries? What have you discovered? Let us know in the comments section below.

     


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    bookplate

    It's #GivingTuesday—the time of year we give back to the causes we are most passionate about. And today, you have the opportunity to give back while also giving a loved one a truly special gift.

    Donate $50 or more today, and give your loved one the unique gift of having his or her name placed in a brand new book entering the Library's circulation across NYC!

    It's pretty simple:

    • Make a donation of $50 or more in someone's name. (Or your own!)
    • Write a special message that will appear inside a real circulating book on NYPL's shelves.
    • We'll snail mail a special card to your loved one (or you can send an e-card), letting him or her know about your gift!

    That's all! A book with your custom message will be processed and placed on our shelves within a few weeks, where it will be checked out, read, and enjoyed by New Yorkers all thanks to your support.

    Honor a loved one with a New York Public Library bookplate today – or buy one for yourself! It’s a great way to celebrate the season with a tangible reminder of how you’re making a difference. You can also share the posts below on Twitter and Facebook to let your friends know about this special #GivingTuesday offer:


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    The Powerpuff Girls 2016
    Image Courtesy of Cartoon Network.

    I attended the Powerpuff Girls Panel at this year's New York Comic Con, and scored an interview with two of the show's writers: Jake Goldman and Haley Mancini, who is also the voice of Princess Morbucks!

    HALEY MANCINI & JAKE GOLDMAN READING.
    Photo courtesy of Jake Goldman and Haley Mancini.

    The Powerpuff Girls is the Emmy nominated reboot of the 1998 Craig McCracken girl power super hero action comedy which debuted this past April. Bubbles, Blossom, and Buttercup were created when Professor Utonium attempted to creat the perfect little girl in his lab using sugar spice and everything nice... and accidentily a good measure of "Chemical X" as well. The result was not one but three girls with super powers, who put them to good use defending the city of Townsville from a cast of comedic supervillains.

    This week kicks off a whole week of new episodes (5pm ET/PT) on Cartoon Network. Get to know Haley and Jake and find out what they are reading:

    What are you reading at the moment?

    HALEY MANCINI: I’m reading Hillbilly Elegy as my “fast-read,” A Dance with Dragons as my “gonna take a while read” and The Hero with a Thousand Faces as my … “audiobook.”

    JAKE GOLDMANAndre The Giant: Life and Legend by Box Brown. I’m equal parts obsessed with Pro Wrestling, Comic books and The Princess Bride, so this really is the perfect thing for me.

    Book Covers

    What books (or other media) do you come back to again and again?

    MANCINI: I always come back to a few stories. I love horror, and the most haunting piece of horror I’ve ever read is Letter to a Young Lady in Paris by Julio Cortázar. It’s the story of a man who moves into his girlfriend’s apartment in Paris and slowly loses his mind in the most unusual way possible. The end leaves you turning it over in your brain for years. I also always return to Crichton books like The Andromeda Strain and Jurassic Park, for his scientific accuracy in the realm of science fiction. Finally, I just always find myself re-reading The Great Gatsby and Wuthering Heights because they’re so intensely visual. I love books that make you not want to ever see the movie because you hold the memories they gave you so perfectly in your own mind.                

    GOLDMAN: I reread a lot of Kurt Vonnegut. Slaughterhouse-Five was the first book that genuinely changed my worldview. I actually keep a copy of Welcome To The Monkey House (one of his collections of short stories) by my desk if I ever need a quick refresh of anything Americana and strange.

    Book Covers

    What books, shows, or other media is most responsible for you becoming a writer?

    MANCINI: Judy Blume and Jack London had the biggest influence on me as a child in making me want to write initially, and movies like Welcome to the Dollhouse made me aware that even small events can become big stories. Shows like Seinfeld, Rocky and Bullwinkle, Johnny Carson, SNL, Mr. Show, and Big Train definitely made me want to write sketch comedy. But easily my biggest inspiration and teacher is the first 10 seasons of The Simpsons. It’s simultaneously funny and heartfelt, and ultimately it’s about family. I love that. Oh, and The Far Side. Still funny as ever.

    Now, if we’re talking about what directly made me become a writer, it’s the Upright Citizens Brigade in LA. I’d never studied writing before I saw a show there, and after I saw a few, I realized that I really, really wanted to know how to make that happen. So I saved up the money I was earning from tutoring and took classes!

    GOLDMAN: The Onion. I was in high school and started reading Our Dumb Century and was blown away. That book helped me survive AP History. It was also the first time I read something and felt like if I tried to write my own I could maybe not horribly embarrass myself. Years later, I actually got my start interning for The Onion while I was in college, and struggled not to be too nerdy around the staff there (I failed).           

    Book Covers

    Jake, Did working on Futurama inspire or guide your current writing style and process?      

    GOLDMAN: Most definitely. Futurama was, in many ways, my grad school. David X. Cohen, Matt Groening and the entire crew really set the bar for me both personally and professionally. Also, with the show, they managed to do something that is still the Holy Grail for me: Make a comedy with genuine heartfelt moments. I tend to like stories with characters who treat people like actual people and aren’t just ridiculously over-the-top jerkfaces.                                                   

    Haley, you’ve done a lot of voice acting. Who are your voice acting heroes?Mel Blanc

    MANCINI: My VO heroes are definitely the classics like Mel Blanc, but I love Tress MacNeille, Nancy Cartwright, Pamela Hayden, and of course, Jennifer Hale, the original Princess Morbucks! They all bring such range, depth, and comedy to their characters, as well as a vulnerability I’m always striving for. Another of my heroes is my dear friend Eric Bauza! He and my other friend Matt Danner actually gave me my very first voiceover gig on a show of Danner’s right after I moved to LA, when they saw me in an improv show. Now here we are, years later, as close as we’ve ever been and working together again to boot! It truly was a surreal moment to hop in the booth with Bauza as we voiced an episode of The Powerpuff Girls together.

    Jake, you’ve done a little acting (voice and otherwise) as well. Any plans for more?

    GOLDMAN: Oh most assuredly. I’m still a drama kid at heart, so how could I ever overdramatically turn my back on…::deep inhale:: the craft?!

    What is the writing process for The Powerpuff Girls? Do you write together or is a lot of the work done independently?

    MANCINI: Team, team, team. Our showrunners Nick Jennings (Executive Producer, The Powerpuff Girls) and Bob Boyle (Co-Executive Producer, The Powerpuff Girls) plus Jake and I will come into a meeting with a premise. After we develop it out a bit, it’s time to ‘break’ it into an episode. We have our own groove on this, but we definitely built part of that off a cool method I learned from some other shows I’ve written on (special shout out to Chris Savino on The Loud House), using post-its and notecards. Then Jakey or myself is assigned the episode (Or both of us! Those are the most fun!), and we get to work on a detailed outline! We don’t go to script because our show is storyboard driven. So, after the outline is written and rewrites are taken care of, we hand it off to the storyboard artists for them to bring it to life! That’s the real secret—our artists are geniuses, artistically and comedically. It’s an incredibly collaborative effort. We all pitch in!

    GOLDMAN: It really does take a village to make an episode of The Powerpuff Girls. Each episode of The Powerpuff Girls takes months to make, so even when we’re done writing, we’re always working with our awesome actors, storyboarders, editors, directors and artists to fine-tune the show as it’s being put together.  Even though Haley and I alternate as lead writer on episodes, we’re always working together in some way shape or form, even if it’s just Haley and I texting jokes and photos of her cat back and forth at odd hours of the night.

    The Loud House

    What role, if any, have libraries played in your lives?

    MANCINI: I’m a library girl and a voracious reader. Nothing beats the feel of an actual book in your hands. Also, nothing beats reading if you want to become a writer!

    GOLDMAN: Being that I live in a city that is known for its traffic, I’m constantly at my library getting audio books for the many many hours that I sit in my car. Being stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffic is much easier when you have Jim Dale (or Stephen Fry, if you prefer) reading you Harry Potter.

    Optional bonus questions: What books do you think the Powerpuff girls would be reading?

    MANCINI: I think the Powerpuff Girls would be reading:

    ·         Blossom: Meditationsby Marcus Aurelius, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People and The Art of War (AND probably Jane Eyre on the side)

    ·         Buttercup: Spiderman(any issue)

    ·         Bubbles: The Island of the Blue Dolphins or Paddington Bear or Curious George. Anything with animals.

    GOLDMAN:

    ·         Blossom: Nancy Drew Mysteries by Carolyn Keene

    ·         Bubbles: Oh, The Places You’ll Go! by Dr. Seuss

    ·         Buttercup: A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle

    Book Covers

    What about Princess Morbucks and some of the other villains?

    MANCINI:

    ·         The Prince by Machiavelli…and A Little Princess, but a version specially written for her where the little girl doesn’t ever get poor.

    ·         Mojo would also be reading The Art of War, but for a less noble reason than Blossom. He’d probably also sneak in a romance novel on the side.

    ·         The Fashionistas exclusively read Gossip rags and fashion blogs

    ·         Man Boy would just read woodworking manuals

    GOLDMAN:

    ·         Morbucks: How to Win at the Sport of Business: If I Can Do It, You Can Do It by Mark Cuban

    ·         Mojo: Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert

    Book Covers

    Haley, Any chance you will lend your Muay Thai skills to Morbucks to help her fight the Powerpuff Girls?

    MANCINI: I tried to teach her, but she just sent an assistant to learn for her! Then I tried to explain to her that that’s not how learning works, and she fired both me AND the assistant. Sigh.

    ***

    What celebrities or public figures are you curious about? Whose book list would you like to read? Let us know in the comments!


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    Subscribe on iTunes.

    Sarah Sze is a visual artist best known for challenging the boundaries of sculpture, painting, and architecture. She is a Macarthur Fellow and has shown at museums around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum, and the Guggenheim Museum. This week for the New York Public Library Podcast, we're proud to present Sze discussing scale, gravity, and value in her work.

    Sarah Sze

    Speaking of her piece Portable Planetarium, Sze described the way that scale works in viewing Earth:

    "I knew I wanted to make something that felt like this kind of very desperate attempt to understand the earth and it almost cobbled together in a pathetic way but in a very beautiful way and it really felt like it was on the edge of growing beyond its own capacity to support itself. But I didn’t know this about the piece, which I think that video a little bit shows, which is that when you came into the room you recognized it immediately as this image that we often have seen photographically or filmically from very, very far away and we immediately feel as if we’re incredibly small in time and space and usually it kind of pulls back from the earth and there’s this amazing sense of both the significance and lack of significance. But with this piece you came in and and as you moved towards it, there was this very surprising moment where the piece actually became like a nest around you and engulfed you and you stood there, it was just enough room for one person and instead of having that feeling of being pulled away, you had much more of a kind of Vitruvian Man feeling of being the center of the earth and this surprising moment."


    Sze spoke about the importance of gravity to her pieces. She couched her discussion in images of gravity working on objects and her own manipulation of gravity in painting:

    "When you talk about gravity, it always has implications about gravitas, I think, too, but that this idea of, you know, of how everything is—gravity, coming from being a painter, gravity is this incredible thing to play with in the work, so everything, even the plants having the gravity pull them down, the peregrine falcon floating in this image, this idea of wondering how gravity is affecting what’s going on and the inevitable collapse of any of these things over time because of gravity is something I think it’s a sort of a tool that is something I play with all the time."


    In reference to Measuring Stick, Sze related the story of how she played with value in a charity auction: 

    "I was thinking about the idea of measurement and how we measure things in terms of value, in terms of time, in terms of location, in terms of an object. And these are—so these are portraits that I did, because I was actually asked to give a donation to a nonprofit and I didn’t have like an easy thing to give to an auction. And so I said,  'I’ll do a portrait, and whoever buys the portrait they need to give me in a sealed envelope twelve of the most important events of their life, and I will draw a picture of each of those in no particular order,' so this idea that they’re all sort of cobbled together historically, and one falls into the next and then I’ll tear up that and then I’ll give them back this drawing. And, you know, it had something to do with this idea of measurement, and how we create meaning, how we measure things, how we even have a portrait of our own lives, and how we find meaning retrospectively, you know, ten years from now if I asked you the twelve events would they be the same, and also about I think about how a conversation or what a portrait is and how you find meaning in another person. It was a kind of incredible relationship with the person too."


    You can subscribe to the New York Public Library Podcast to hear more conversations with wonderful artists, writers, and intellectuals. Join the conversation today!


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    mark twain

    Mark Twain is known for his humor, his shrewd intellect, his one-of-a-kind writing voice… and especially his pitch-perfect sayings.

    So, in honor of Twain’s birthday, we asked our experts here at The New York Public Library to recommend not only their favorite books by the Mississippi author, but their favorite quotations as well.

    yankee

    A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

    “You see my kind of loyalty was loyalty to one’s country, not to its institutions or its office-holders. The country is the real thing, the substantial thing, the eternal thing; it is the thing to watch over, and care for, and be loyal to; institutions are extraneous, they are its mere clothing, and clothing can wear out, become ragged, cease to be comfortable, cease to protect the body from winter, disease, and death. To be loyal to rags, to shout for rags, to worship rags, to die for rags -- that is a loyalty of unreason, it is pure animal; it belongs to monarchy, was invented by monarchy; let monarchy keep it.”
    (Alessandra Affinito, Chatham Square)

     

     

    wilson

    Pudd’nhead Wilson; and Those Extraordinary Twins

    “Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear — not absence of fear.”
    (Anne Rouyer, Mulberry Street)

     

    Taming the Bicycle

    “Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live.”
    (Jenny Baum, Jefferson Market)

     

    mississippi

    Life on the Mississippi

    “The face of the water, in time, became a wonderful book—a book that was a dead language to the uneducated passenger, but which told its mind to me without reserve, delivering its most cherished secrets as clearly as if it uttered them with a voice. And it was not a book to be read once and thrown aside, for it had a new story to tell every day.”
    (Miriam Tuliao, BookOps)

     


     

    innocents

    The Innocents Abroad

    “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things can not be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.”
    (Nancy Aravacz, Jefferson Market)

     

     

     

     

    mysterious

    The Mysterious Stranger and Other Stories

    “The handful will shout louder. A few fair men on the other side will argue and reason against the war with speech and pen, and at first will have a hearing and be applauded; but it will not last long; those others will outshout them, and presently the anti-war audiences will thin out and lose popularity. Before long you will see this curious thing: the speakers stoned from the platform, and free speech strangled by hordes of furious men who in their secret hearts are still at one with those stoned speakers - as earlier - but do not dare to say so. And now the whole nation - pulpit and all - will take up the war-cry, and shout itself hoarse, and mob any honest man who ventures to open his mouth; and presently such mouths will cease to open. Next the statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting the blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception.”
    (Jeff Katz, Chatham Square)

    “Are you so unobservant as not to have found out that sanity and happiness are an impossible combination? No sane man can be happy, for to him life is real, and he sees what a fearful thing it is. Only the mad can be happy, and not many of those. The few that imagine themselves kings or gods are happy, the rest are no happier than the sane.”
    (Virginia Bartow, Rare Books)

    huck finn

    Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

    “They went off and I got aboard the raft, feeling bad and low, because I knowed very well I had done wrong, and I see it warn’t no use for me to try to learn to do right; a body that don’t get started right when he’s little ain’t got no show—when the pinch comes there ain’t nothing to back him up and keep him to his work, and so he gets beat.  Then I thought a minute, and says to myself, hold on; s’pose you’d a done right and give Jim up, would you felt better than what you do now?  No, says I, I’d feel bad—I’d feel just the same way I do now.  Well, then, says I, what’s the use you learning to do right when it’s troublesome to do right and ain’t no trouble to do wrong, and the wages is just the same?  I was stuck.  I couldn’t answer that.  So I reckoned I wouldn’t bother no more about it, but after this always do whichever come handiest at the time.”
    (David Nochimson, Pelham Parkway-Van Nest)

    And the author's note at the beginning of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn:“Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.”
    (Gregory Barry, Parkchester)

    ---

    Have trouble reading standard print? Many of these titles are available in formats for patrons with print disabilities.

    Staff picks are chosen by NYPL staff members and are not intended to be comprehensive lists. We'd love to hear your ideas too, so leave a comment and tell us what you’d recommend. And check out our Staff Picks browse tool for more recommendations!


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    Not every mom designs a curriculum for her preschool child, but NYPL helped Trenicia see possibilities—especially when she added more than one branch library into the equation. The combination of multiple library locations, diverse children's programs, and lots of books helped Trenicia boost her daughter's early literacy and ability to engage with different people.

    Library Stories is a video series from The New York Public Library that shows what the Library means to our users, staff, donors, and communities through moving personal interviews.

    Like, share, and watch more Library Stories on Facebook or YouTube.

    Trenicia Childs, Parent/Educator, at Pelham Parkway-Van Nest Library

     

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    world aids day
    Image via AIDS.gov

    World AIDS Day is held on December 1 each year and is an opportunity for people worldwide to unite in the fight against HIV, show their support for people living with HIV and to commemorate those who have died. World AIDS Day was the first ever global health day, held for the first time in 1988.

    To commemorate the day, we're re-sharing our 2014 video Stories from the Collections: Women, AIDS, and Incarceration, a short film discussing activist Katrina Haslip, founder of ACE (AIDS Counseling and Education), and her work helping incarcerated women living with HIV/AIDS. The film was produced for the NYPL exhibition Why We Fight: Remembering AIDS Activism in 2014, and features archival materials from the exhibition and our collections.

    For more information about World AIDS Day and HIV/AIDS, visit the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service's website. There, you can find general information, resources for testing and care services, social media awareness campaigns, and more.

    You can also view photographs and ephemera from ACT UP New York in our Digital Collections. The AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) was founded in March 1987 at the Lesbian and Gay Community Center (now The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center) in New York City's Greenwich Village as an organization devoted to direct action (demonstrations and civil disobedience) to call the attention of government officials, scientists, drug companies and other corporations, and the general public to the severity of the AIDS crisis and its impact on the lives of individuals.


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    If you think of baked goods and literature, what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Proust’s madeleine? Bilbo’s seed cake? Last year, we decided to get creative and bake cookies with a literary twist for National Cookie Day on December 4. We had so much fun baking and eating the cookies that we thought we'd do another round of #CookieLit this year. We hope you’ll enjoy these literary cookies and share your own #CookieLit ideas.

    For a fun bit of "cookie lit" check out Cookie Monster's homage to "This Is Just to Say" by William Carlos Williams  on Twitter. Happy National Cookie (Lit) Day!

    Dis is just to say

    Thanks to all the bakers at Mid-Manhattan Library,  thanks to Billy Parrot for cookie lit ideas, and many thanks to Arieh Ress for the fabulous cookie lit photos!

    Want to bake your own? Check out our Cookie Lit 2016 Recipes.
     

    Ghost Chili Chocolate Chip Cookies baked by Ari Ress

    Ghost Chili Chocolate Chip / Fahrenheit 451

    “A book is a loaded gun in the house next door...Who knows who might be the target of the well-read man?”—Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

    These ghost pepper chocolate chip cookies look like the traditional favorites, but they finish with a pleasurable burn. The original recipe included red food dye as a heat warning, but Ari opted for a more natural look. 

    Farm Animal Sugar Cookies baked by Jessica Cline

     

    Farm animal sugar cookies / Animal Farm

    “Weak or strong, clever or simple, we are all brothers.” —George Orwell, Animal Farm

    Horses, sheep, and PIGS! We think all of these iced animal cookies are equally cute, but you might decide that some animal cookies are cuter than others. 

    George Sand Dollars baked by Liz Baldwin

     

    George Sand Dollars

    “Life resembles a novel more often than novels resemble life.” —George Sand, Métella

    These crisp sugar cookie sand dollars topped with almond slivers resemble the original quite closely. George Sand wrote that “the truth is too simple: one must always get there by a complicated route.” Clearly, there were no reliable cookie mixes in the 19th century. Liz used one as the base for these beauties. 

    Canadian Maple Cookies baked by Jessica Jackson

    Candian Maple Lit

    “It’s just life. You can’t beat life.”—Alice Munro, “The Bear Came Over the Mountain”

    There is so much great Canadian literature to enjoy, and like Canadians, it is incredibly diverse. But these simple cookies made with real maple syrup are the perfect accompaniment to any Canadian book you choose! 

    Lemon Honey Chamomile Cookies baked by Susen Shi

    Honey Lemon Chamomile Cookies/ Big Sleep

    It seemed like a nice neighborhood to have bad habits in.”—Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep

    We love Philip Marlowe’s drinking and smoking on page and screen, but in real life, you might  sleep better if you partake of these sleepytime inspired cookies with some herbal tea as you enjoy the exploits of Chandler’s great hardboiled hero. 

    Hermits baked by Elizabeth Waters

    hermits

    “This is my letter to the world / That never wrote to me.” —Emily Dickinson

    Perhaps Massachusetts poet Emily Dickinson enjoyed these classic spicy New England bar cookies while reading or writing in seclusion. We think these hearty hermit bars would cheer the day of any literary recluse, real or fictional. (Note to Miss Havisham: Hermits keep longer than wedding cake.) 

    Apple Drop Cookies baked by Melissa Scheurer

    Apple drop cookies / Edge of the Orchard

    “But John Chapman told us he didnt eat meat cause he couldnt stand for somethin livin to be killed jest to keep him alive. —Tracy Chevalier, At the Edge of the Orchard

    We think John Chapman, aka Johnny Appleseed, would love these apple drop cookies Melissa baked with fruit she picked at a local orchard. 

    Caribbean Coconut Mango Cookies baked by Alison Quammie

    Caribbean coconut mango cookies

    What's poetry, if it's worth its salt,/ but a phrase men can pass from hand to mouth? —Derek Walcott, “Forest of Europe”
     
    This delicately simple recipe, and ever so refreshing, lures one into the archipelago of lush green Caribbean isles. Enjoy these cookies while listening to a podcast of Nobel laureate Derek Walcott speaking about Hemingway and the Caribbean at LIVE from the NYPL, or while reading your favorite Caribbean author. 
     

    Beet Chocolate Chip Cookies baked by Elizabeth Waters

    Beet / Beat Chocolate Chip

    “I saw that my life was a vast glowing empty page and I could do anything I wanted.” —Jack Kerouac, Dharma Bums

    We recommend these unorthodox chocolate chip cookies made with healthy fresh beets to accompany a reading of On the Road, Howl, and other beat classics. We’re not sure that any cookies are a good pairing with Naked Lunch, however, unless maybe they all are... East Villager Alan Ginsberg would probably have liked the borscht I made with the leftover beets.

     

    Cookie Love

    Any more literary cookies to suggest?  We'd love to see them! If you're looking for recipe ideas, check out a cookie cookbook. The lit part is up to you. If anyone has a great cookie recipe with 22 ingredients to pair with Joseph Heller's Catch-22, do share.

    Please comment below, share your #CookieLit ideas on our Facebook page, tweet them to us @midmanhattanlib, or tag us in your Instagram photos @MidManhattanLibrary.

    Don't forget to use the hashtag #CookieLit when you do!


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    Welcome to Best Books for Kids 2016: 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing!​

    bbfk

    This annual list is a century-old tradition in which the New York Public Library’s book experts select 100 noteworthy children's titles from categories including: picture books, young readers, fiction, graphic novels, folklore & fairy tales, poetry, and nonfiction.

    The committee read every children's book, published in 2016, that they could get their hands on. Below are their top 10 showstopper favorites.

    Check out the whole list online at nypl.org/kids2016.  Let us know what you think in the comments below, or on social media with the hashtag #BestBooks.

    Top 10 (arranged alphabetically) 

    The Great Pet Escape

    The Great Pet Escapeby Victoria Jamieson

    Graphic novel, Animals, Friendship, Funny

    Join the class pets of Daisy P. Flugelhorn Elementary School for a hilarious adventure as they make a break for freedom and save their school along the way.

     

     

     

     

    It Ain't So Awful, Falafel

    It Ain’t So Awful, Falafelby Firoozeh Dumas

    Middle-grade fiction, Coming of age, Culturally diverse, Family, Friendship, Funny, Historical

    It’s 1979 and Zomorod (Cindy) is trying to fit into her new life in southern California. When the hostage crisis hits the headlines, she finds herself explaining all things Iranian, when all she wants is to rock a pom-pom belt.

     

     

     

    jazz

    Jazz Day: The Making of a Famous Photograph by Roxane Orgill & Francis Vallejo

    Nonfiction, Culturally diverse, Historical, Multiple perspectives, Poetry

    Neighborhood children, a photographer, and a group of musicians share laughter and music on a hot day in Harlem.





     

    The Night Gardener

     

    The Night Gardener by Terry & Eric Fan

    Picture books, Really great art

    Grimloch Lane is transformed by a mysterious stranger who creates magical topiaries by moonlight and inspires a young boy’s imagination.

     

     

    Pink is for Blobfish

    Pink Is for Blobfish: Discovering the World’s Perfectly Pink Animals by Jess Keating & David DeGrand

    Nonfiction, Animals

    Pretty in pink? Think again! Have fun with this informative study of the extraordinary rosy- hued creatures that populate our world.

    The Princess and the Warrior

    The Princess and the Warrior: A Tale of Two Volcanoesby Duncan Tonatiuh

    Fairy tales & Folklore, Culturally diverse, Really great art

    These illustrations in the style of the Mixtec Codices bring 12 to life an ancient, Aztec love story.

     

    Pugs of the Frozen North

    Pugs of the Frozen Northby Philip Reeve & Sarah McIntyre

    Easy readers, Animals, Family, Fantasy, Friendship, Funny, Offbeat

    Sika and Shen (and their team of 66 pugs!) want to win the Great Northern Race and meet the Snowfather, who will reward them with their heart’s desire.

     

     

     

    The Secret Subway

    The Secret Subway by Shana Corey & Red Nose Studio

    Nonfiction, Historical, Picture books, Really great art, True stories

    Discover New York City’s earliest incarnation of the subway system, told with exquisite stop-motion-esque figures.


     

    Thunder Boy Jr.

    Thunder Boy Jr. by Sherman Alexie & Yuyi Morales

    Picture books, Culturally diverse, Family, Really great art

    What’s in a name? Find out in this story about a father and son.

     

     

    The Wild Robot

    The Wild Robotby Peter Brown

    Middle-grade fiction, Animals, Coming of age, Emotionally intense, Family, Friendship, Inspiring, Really great art, Science fiction

    Shipwrecked on a deserted island, robot Roz must adapt her factory settings and learn how to live in the natural world.

     

     

     

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    Have trouble reading standard print? Many of these titles are available in formats for patrons with print disabilities.

    Staff picks are chosen by NYPL staff members and are not intended to be comprehensive lists. We'd love to hear your ideas too, so leave a comment and tell us what you’d recommend. And check out our Staff Picks browse tool for more recommendations!


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    It’s the mooooost wonderful tiiiiime of the year: time for our annual NYPL Best Books for Teens list!

    bbft top 10

    A committee of 20 dedicated librarians read (and read and read) all the young-adult books published in 2016 that we could get our hands on. Then we debated, voted, and came up with our 50 favorite books of the year—fiction, nonfiction, graphic novels, comic books, fantasy, history, sports, and more.

    We’ve got Brooklyn brujas and old-school witches from Salem; surfers and basketball players; gamers and activists; samurais and monsters and fairies and detectives.

    We’ve got true stories that transport you to unexplored places and superheroes you already know and love.

    We’ve got feminists, undocumented immigrants, transgender teens, and homeless youths looking for a new start.

    We’ve got Alaska in the 1970s, France in the 12th century, riding stables in Philadelphia, a Tokyo boarding school, and the coolest magical summer camp in the universe.

    And we’re hoping that every reader finds something to love on this list.

    Out of these 50 books our committee loved, we also plucked our absolute top 10 favorites. After nearly a year of reading, these are the titles we just can’t stop talking about.  

    Don't forget to check out the full list online! Let us know what you think in the comments below, or on social media with the hashtag #BestBooks. And vote for your own favorites on SurveyMonkey!

    Top Ten Favorites (in alphabetical order)

    Being Jazz by Jazz Jennings

    jazz

    Jazz speaks openly and authentically about what it means to grow up transgender.

    Jazz writes in a truly authentic voice. She’s overcome so much at such a young age and managed to stay positive through most of her journey.”—Chelsey Masterson, Belmont

    “A surprisingly uplifting story. Jazz is really lucky to have parents who are willing to support her choices and fight for her rights, and their support has given her a voice that she can use to help the transgender community.” —Andrea Lipinski, Kingsbridge

     



    Burn Baby Burn by Meg Medina

    burn baby burn

    Nora's just trying to survive the sweltering Queens summer of 1977. But it's tough with a violent brother, a city-wide blackout, and a serial killer on the loose.

    “Great read! It felt so real and believable. I was almost transported to 1977.” —Shyiesha Watson, 125th Street

    “1977 doesn't quite count as historical fiction but the details of this book are so immersive it is easy to feel transported to another, darker city.” —Caitlyn Colman-McGaw, Young Adult Programming

    “Best book I read all year!!!”—Shauntee Burns, MyLibraryNYC

     

    The Callby Peadar O'Guilin

    the call

    Three minutes and four seconds. Three minutes and four seconds to stay alive. Three minutes and four seconds to escape the Sídhe, a race of ancient Irish fairies out for blood.

    “A dystopian version of Ireland where teenagers are taught to worship physical perfection, and anything less is considered a death sentence (because of The Call, when they'll be killed by fairies). Nessa, the main character, is physically disabled, which makes the book incredibly suspenseful. An engaging and original concept, and I'm interested to see where the series goes.”—Ben Sapadin, Morris Park

    “The creepiness level in this is a 20. The Grey Land is fantastically described, the terror of the teenagers is palpable, and I really like the Irish folklore that the novel takes inspiration from.” —Susen Shi, Mid-Manhattan

    “I secretly started training, just in case I ever get THE CALL.”—Katie Fernandez, Bronx Library Center


    Exit, Pursued by a Bearby E.K. Johnston

    exit pursued by a bear

    Hermione is strong, confident, and ready to take on the world. But after she's raped, her life turns upside down.

    “One of the most powerful realistic fiction stories I’ve read in a while, and my top contender for tearjerker of the year so far.”—Andrea Lipinski, Kingsbridge

    “We all know how difficult a topic abortion can be, but the way Johnston lays it out there —talking about the different women in the recovery room and how they were all one for that moment —was really touching. And it was refreshing to read about Hermione being empowered rather than having to be defensive for the decisions she makes. Excellent read.” —Katrina Ortega, Hamilton Grange

     

    Lumberjanes, Vols. 3 (A Terrible Plan)& 4 (Out of Time) by Shannon Watters, Noelle Stevenson, Grace Ellis, and Brooke Allen

    lumberjanes

    Best Books for Teens or THE BEST BOOKS EVER?! Our all-time favorite campers embark on new adventures with yetis, blizzards, and so much more.

    “I want to go back in time so I could give these to my 12-year-old self to read. These volumes were even better than the first two, with cohesive one-shot plots, and they show new fun sides of my favorite girls.” —Gwen Glazer, Readers Services

     “Volume 4 might just be the best of the bunch — introduces a trans character, more queer love popping up in unexpected places, and beautiful friendships abound.” —Lyndsie Guy, Chatham Square


     

    Ms. Marvel, Vol 5: Super Famous by G. Willow Wilson and Takeshi Miyazawa

    ms marvel

    Fighting bad guys, attending family weddings, doing homework... Kamala tries to do it all, with the help of some clones.

    “Kamala deals with how difficult it is to balance being a normal girl in high school, as well as being an Avenger and saving Jersey City from one calamity after another. I also liked the side storylines between Bruno's new girlfriend and her brother getting married to a girl who is not Muslim. Good read!”—Joe Pascullo, Grand Central

    I love the introduction of new characters Mike and Tyesha (and the other Hillman family). Not only are they reflective of the diversity of our teens, they're eminently relatable with likable, well-developed personalities written with intent rather than afterthought.” —Crystal Chen, Muhlenberg
     

    Outrun the Moon by Stacey Lee

    outrun the moon

    Nothing will stand in the way of Mercy Wong's dreams, except maybe the San Francisco earthquake of 1906.

    “A strong, badass, funny female protagonist who accurately portrays how it feels to be marginalized due to gender, race, age, ethnicity, or anything else. Mercy may be a Chinese-American girl from the early 20th century, but the struggles she faced will resound with today’s teens. I also enjoyed the world of Chinatown and all its traditions. It brings forth memories of my childhood and grandparents.” —Susen Shi, Mid-Manhattan

    “Mercy is completely indomitable. She's never met an obstacle she couldn't navigate or bulldoze and she doesn't let bullying or racism slow her down. She is a role model for the ages! The historical details are just the cherry on top of a great book.” —Anne Rouyer, Mulberry Street
     

    Samurai Rising: The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune by Pamela S. Turner and Gareth Hines

    samurai

    Violence, action, revenge... the epic history of a samurai legend.

    Political intrigue, murder, love, and severed heads on sticks make this biography feel like a thriller.” —Karen Ginman, BookOps

    “This book has everything: intrigue, backstabbing, and wavering loyalties. This almost reads like a 12th-century Japanese soap opera. This book is good for those who may be reluctant to read biographies and/or history. Very fascinating look into a dangerous, alluring, ancient world.” —Lauren Besignano, St. George’s

    “This book is a captivating and approachable history of Yoshitsune and the Minamoto family, the tradition of sepukku, and 12th-century Japan.”—Thomas Knowlton, MyLibraryNYC


    The Smell of Other People's Houses by Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock

    smell

    Ruth, Dora, Alyce, and Hank navigate the wilds of 1970s Alaska, and their interweaving stories reveal the meaning of home.

    “A lovely, sharp exploration of what love looks like across families. The teens in the book all face difficult, painful realities but approach their lives and their peers with a kindness that is admirable. The feeling of the cover is the feeling of the book: beautiful, vivid, breathtaking, and very Alaskan.” —Caitlyn Colman-McGaw, Young Adult Programming

    “All the feels. The way the stories intertwine is so ridiculously satisfying in the end. This book gives you hope and makes you want to see the world in an optimistic light like Jack. Two thumbs up; I’ll be trying to get it into the hands of anyone and everyone I know.” —Morgan O’Reilly, Aguilar
     

    Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake

    three down crowns

    Three queens, three powers, one crown. The showdown of a generation.

    “Deliciously dark, surprisingly sexy and diabolically good. It's a smart, well written fantasy that plays with fantasy tropes and then twists them all around. It has it all: magic, mayhem, romance with strong female characters. This fantasy just zoomed to the top of my personal best books list.”—Anne Rouyer, Mulberry Street

     “That last sentence?! Brilliant. I didn’t see it coming at all. When can I get my hands on the second book?”—Morgan O’Reilly, Aguilar

    “I couldn't put this book down. It was well developed, the characters are not your average ‘pretty princesses,’ the plot is unique, and I can’t wait to read the rest of the series.” —Chantalle Uzan, Francis Martin

    ---

    Have trouble reading standard print? Many of these titles are available in formats for patrons with print disabilities.


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    We've got a selection of engaging author talks coming up this month at Mid-Manhattan Library. Come listen to scholars and other experts discuss their recent nonfiction books on a variety of subjects, and ask them questions. Author talks take place at 6:30 PM on the 6th floor of the library unless otherwise noted. No reservations are required. Seating is first come, first served. You can also request a library copy of the authors' books from the catalog by using the links below.

    Our December author talks will be about the borough of Brooklyn, New York City’s architectural landmarks, how the English language is evolving, Muhammad Ali, Ashkenazi cuisine, the history of the Jewish community in Harlem, the story of iridium, Klezmer lecture and musical performance, religious freedom in Flushing, and Pearl Harbor.

    Brooklyn Experience

     

    Monday, December 5, 2016

    The Brooklyn Experience: The Ultimate Guide to Neighborhoods & Noshes, Culture & the Cutting Edge with Ellen Freudenheim, a freelance writer based in Brooklyn.

    This illustrated lecture offers insights into one of the most creative, dynamic cities in the modern world.

    The Landmarks of New York

     

    Tuesday, December 6, 2016

    The Landmarks of New York: An Illustrated, Comprehensive Record of New York City's Historic Buildings with Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel, chairwoman of New York State Council on the Arts and author of 23 books.

    This illustrated lecture showcases New York City’s architectural history and richness, surveying a broad range of styles and building types: colonial farmhouses, Gilded Age mansions, churches, schools, libraries, museums, and the great twentieth-century skyscrapers that are recognized throughout the world.

    Words on the Move

     

    Wednesday, December 7, 2016

    Words on the Move: Why English Won't - and Can't - Sit Still (Like, Literally)with John H. McWhorter, Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University.

    This illustrated lecture takes the audience on a lively tour of how the English language is evolving before our eyes—and argues why we should embrace this transformation, not fight it.

    Muhammad Ali

     

    Monday, December 12, 2016

    Muhammad Ali: Fighter's Heaven 1974: Photographs with Peter Angelo Simon, a photographer whose photographs have been exhibited in museums and galleries internationally, including the Smithsonian.

    This illustrated lecture captures Muhammad Ali up close and unguarded in the run-up to the "Rumble in the Jungle," a historic boxing match in Zaire on October 30, 1974.

    The Gefilte Manifesto

     

    Tuesday, December 13, 2016

    The Gefilte Manifesto: New Recipes for Old World Jewish Foods with Jeffrey Yoskowitz and Liz Alpern, cofounders of The Gefilteria.

    This illustrated lecture explores the authors' mission to revitalize Ashkenazi cuisine with recipes that draw inspiration from Jewish bakeries, neighborhood delis, old-fashioned pickle shops, and their own childhood kitchens.

    The Jews of Harlem

     

    Wednesday, December 14, 2016

    The Jews of Harlem: The Rise, Decline, and Revival of a Jewish Community with Jeffrey S. Gurock, Libby M. Klaperman Professor of Jewish History at Yeshiva University and prize-winning author about American Jewish history.

    This lecture follows Jews into, out of, and back into the renowned metropolitan neighborhood over the course of a century and a half. It analyzes the complex set of forces that brought several generations of central European, East European, and Sephardic Jews to settle in Harlem.

    Eccentric Orbits

     

    Wednesday, December 21, 2016

    Eccentric Orbits: The Iridium Story with John Bloom, a veteran investigative journalist, three-time finalist for the National Magazine Award, and a Pulitzer Prize nominee.

    This lecture traces the conception, development, and launching of Iridium, a revolutionary satellite system developed by Motorola in the early 1990s.

    Klezmer

     

    Thursday, December 22, 2016

    Klezmer : Music, History, and Memory with Dr. Walter Zev Feldman, a leading researcher in Jewish and Ottoman music.
     
    Emerging in 16th century Prague, the klezmer became a central cultural feature of the largest transnational Jewish community of modern times - the Ashkenazim of Eastern Europe. Much of the musical and choreographic history of the Ashkenazim is embedded in the European klezmer repertoire, which functioned as a kind of non-verbal communal memory. Enjoy a lecture with Dr. Walter Zev Feldman and musical performance with violinist Deborah Strauss.
    City of Gods

     

    Tuesday, December 27, 2016

    City of Gods: Religious Freedom, Immigration, and Pluralism in Flushing, Queens with R. Scott Hanson, lecturer in History at the University of Pennsylvania and an Affiliate of the Pluralism Project at Harvard University.

    This illustrated lecture explores the history of the section in New York City, known locally as the birthplace of American religious freedom, now so diverse and densely populated that it has become a microcosm of world religions.

    Pearl Harbor

     

    Thursday, December 29, 2016

    Pearl Harbor: From Infamy to Greatness with Craig Nelson, historian and author of the New York Times bestseller Rocket Men, and The Age of RadianceThomas PaineLet’s Get Lost, and The First Heroes.

    As we remember the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor and its relevance to American diplomacy today, this illustrated lecture tells the rich personal narratives of sailors, soldiers, pilots, admirals, emperor, and president as they take their place in history—some for the first time in public discourse.

     

    Don’t miss the many interestingfilms, book discussions, and computer and technology classes on our program calendar. If you would like to sit back and listen to a good story, try out our Story Time for Grown-ups. The theme for this month is Holiday Cheer. If you enjoy talking about books with other readers, join us on Friday, December 9th for Open Book Night. The theme this month is Winter Reads.

    All of our programs and classes are free, so why not come and check one out? Hope to see you soon at the library!

    Check out Mid-Manhattan Library's December 2016 book-related programs:


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    Searching for the perfect gift for a library lover? Look no further! Check out these gifts from our Library Shop.

    1. Neil Gaiman Tote Bag

    Neil Gaiman Tote Bag

    Fill this canvas bag from our Wise Words collection with dreams and still have space in the inner pocket for material things. Like your keys.

    Begin your literary journey.

    2. Mini Book Light

    Mini Book Light

    Read in any circumstance with this powerful LED lamp that can fit in your pocket. Did we mention it can charge your phone, too?

    Find your pocket-sized super book.

    3. Library Card Scarf​

    Library Card Scarf

    We’re all a little nostalgic for date stamps and paper library cards. Wear your happy memories with style in this cotton/silk scarf.

    Celebrate nostalgia.

    4. When in Doubt Tee

    When in Doubt Go to the Library T-Shirt

    Whether you’re a fan or looking for some sage advice, Hermione’s words ring true. Show that proudly with this 100% cotton shirt.

    For witches and wizards of all sorts.

    5. Library Stamp Desk Caddy

    Library Stamp Desk Caddy

    The stamp originated with The New York Public Library itself. The wood is reclaimed heart of pine. Your desk is infinitely cooler and a touch neater. You’re welcome.

    Treat yourself.

    6. Tequila Mockingbird

    Tequila Mockingbird

    Filled to the brim with literary references and puns (Gin Eyre anyone?), this cocktail book is the ideal chaser to a long day for those more liquidly inclined.

    Get your literary drink on.

    7. Card Catalog

    Card Catalog

    Invigorate To Do lists by writing them on the back of classics like Moby Dick. Then put them in the matching envelope and file away. Like a real card catalog!

    Spruce up your notecards.

    8. Due Date Tie

    Due Date Tie

    This silk tie transports you back to the time when library books had to be stamped by hand, marginalia roamed free, and the scent of books filled the air. (Scent of books not included.)

    But you can get the tie.

    9. Quote Magnet Set

    Quote Magnet Set

    Does that wall/fridge/lamp look a little bare? Is life lacking that certain dose of inspiration?

    Spruce it up with our Wise Words magnet set.

    10. Shakespeare Quote Necklace

    Shakespeare Necklace

    A gift for fierce ladies of all statures. That Hermia is sure to love the sterling silver quote and lion. (Reads: “Although she be but little, she is fierce.”)

    Get your bold necklace.

    11. Banned Books Bracelet

    Banned Books Bracelet

    This lead-free banned book bracelet is a perfect accessory for that librarian who wishes Banned Book Week could be every day of the year.

    Get some serious banned swag.

    12. Fran Lebowitz Quote Mug

    Fran Lebowitz Mug

    This 11 oz mug from our Wise Words collection provides some good advice and another reason to love books. (And it’s dishwasher and microwave safe, to boot.)

    Fill your head.

    13. Punk Rock Authors Tote

    Punk Rock Authors Tote

    Finally! A tote for the book lover with an attitude.

    Get yours today.

    14. Library Stamp Pouch

    Red Vintage Library Stamp Pouch

    Tote too big? Try a canvas pouch adorned with the vintage stamp once used at NYPL.

    Comes in Red (pictured), Light Denim (also pictured),Gray, Black, and Dark Denim, too!

    15. Raven Scarf

    Raven Scarf

    Share your darker side by wearing this cotton infinity scarf boasting the entire Poe poem. Soon enough, you’ll be looking at other scarves and saying “Nevermore!”

    Make Poe proud.

    16. Book Stack Earrings

    Book Stack Earrings

    Never be too far from a good book with these earrings.

    Available in Gold and Silver.

    Get your order in by December 14th to ensure arrival by Christannukah eve (December 24th).

    Get Shop Updates by Email

    Want 10% off your next order? Sign up for weekly e-newsletter to get exclusive offers and updates will go straight to your inbox. Plus, follow the NYPL Shop on Facebook and Twitter.


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    policy

    Advocates, elected officials, legal counsel and policy analysts. The private sector, both nonprofit and for-profit companies, as well as governmental entities. All must work in concert to achieve positive change for society on real-life issues such as the ethical treatment of animals, the type of energy that is used to fuel power plants, and screening pre-K kids for possible giftedness. No one professional works in a vacuum.

    The field of policy analysis was born in the 1970s, though the tradition of advising rulers has been around pretty much since the beginning of civilization, as the title suggests. (Machiavelli was an Italian diplomat in the 16th Century.) However, It has evolved through the decades. In the beginning, policy analysis was seen more as protecting the prevailing administration. Now, analysts must work with a variety of stakeholders and dispense information that either supports pending legislation or points to challenges in implementation or suggests taking an entirely new direction in order to resolve an issue.

    Policy analysts use news and academic articles to understand societal issues that affect proposed legislation. Then, they prepare oral and/or written reports that may include recommendations for elected officials. Lawmakers would not be able to complete their jobs without policy and financial analysts, legal counsel and administrative and support staff. Listening to input from the administration and advocates is also invaluable.

    Beyond Machiavelli: Policy Analysis Comes of Age by Beryl Radin, 2000

    I appreciated the nuts-and-bolts look at the policy analysis profession, though the book is 16 years old. This is the best book that I have read about the subject. Incidentally, there has been a revision: Beyond Machiavelli: Policy Analysis Reaches Midlife.

     


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    During the week, it can be tough to stay on top of everything. On Fridays, though, we suggest kicking back to catch up on all the delightful literary reading the internet has to offer. Don’t have the time to hunt for good reads? Never fear. We’ve rounded up the best bookish reading of the week for you.

    animalcookies

    We Read...

    The #BestBooks for Teens. As National Book Award winner and civil rights icon John Lewis said, "Read every. Be kind. Be bold." Another quotable hero? Mark Twain. It doesn't get much better than book-inspired cookies made by librarians. The oldest library in the world was founded by a woman; now it's been restored by a woman. Delve into 1930s and 1940s New York. Why yes, you can read Miles Davis's liner notes for "Kind of Blue." Sarah Sze talks about challenging artistic boundaries in our podcast. Are literary folks mad for madness? Holiday shopping has never been so easy with these bookish gifts. It's raining; it's pouring. And this is the origin of the umbrella. Check out Louisa May Alcott's notes on publishing.

    Stereogranimator Friday Feels

    //stereo.nypl.org/gallery/index
    GIF made with the NYPL Labs Stereogranimator

    TGIF

    No need to get up! Join our librarians from the home, office, playground — wherever you have internet access — for book recs on Twitter by following our handle @NYPLrecommends from 10 AM to 11 AM every Friday. Or, you can check NYPL Recommends any day of the week for more suggestions. 

    What did you read?

    If you read something fantastic this week, share with our community of readers in the comment section below.


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