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  • 10/26/18--07:59: A Brief History of Halloween
  • Illustration of a girl in hat and nightgown riding on a broom, entitled Jolly Hallowe'en, with the text May fortune smile on you
    Jolly Hallowe'en. Art and Picture Collection, NYPL. NYPL Digital Collections, Image ID: 1587804

    All Hallows' Eve, or Halloween as it is commonly referred, is a global celebration on October 31. It developed from the ancient Celtic ritual of Samhain, which was, in the simplest terms, a festival celebrating the changing of the seasons from light to dark (summer to winter). This would usually take place around November 1. 

    Traditionally, a bonfire would be lit, sweets would be prepared, and costumes would be worn to ward off evil spirits as the ancient Celts believed that, at this time of year, the veil separating the worlds of the living and the dead was at its thinnest.

    Early Christian officials tried to impose their own holiday in an effort to stop their converts from practicing non-Christian festivals. Pope Gregory III deemed November 1, All Saints' Day, a celebration of Christian martyrs and saints, and November 2 became All Souls Day, a day for remembering the souls of the dead.  All Saints' Day later became known as All Hallows' Day, and the previous day, October 31, became known as All Hallows' Eve, then later, Halloween.

    Despite the best efforts of the church, people still continued to celebrate Halloween with traditional bonfires, costumes, treats, and a focus on spirits of the dead.

    All this history is not meant to confuse Halloween and its Mexican cousin, Dia de Muertos, a.k.a. Dia de Los Muertos, a completely separate celebration that occurs during the same timeframe, October 31 to November 2. While Halloween focuses on the dark and grim aspects of death, Dia de Muertos is a celebration of the connection between the living and the dead, as well as life after death. 

    Illustration of three kids having fun with a pumpkin head costume, entitled The Witch
    The Witch. Art and Picture Collection, NYPL. NYPL Digital Collections, Image ID: 1587780

    While Halloween originated in Europe, the holiday became the celebration we recognize today when it was brought to America by the early settlers. People originally carved out turnips and placed candles inside to ward off evil spirits, but Americans switched from turnips to pumpkins.

    In 1820, Washington Irving’s short story, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, became one of the first distinctly American ghost stories centered around the holiday. Halloween received its biggest transformation within the last 50 or so years, thanks to the creation of big candy corporations, and, of course, Hollywood.

    Because of its association with all things dark, spooky, and undead, Halloween became the go-to holiday for the release of most horror films and television shows. Director John Carpenter’s Halloween(1978) is probably the best example, as it changed the public image of the holiday from a night for children to dress up in silly costumes to a night of pure terror.

    Every year, cities and towns all over the world celebrate with festivals, parades, and theme park events. No matter how Halloween is celebrated, or which aspects of the holiday are celebrated, it has become a global phenomenon comparable to Christmas in terms of how widespread and important it is to the public conscience.

    If you would like to learn more about Halloween beyond my extremely brief summary, or just want some spooky suggestions, please check out the recommended titles listed below. Happy Halloween! (All summaries adapted from the publishers.)

    For Little Goblins and Ghouls 

    The Halloween Tree book cover

    The Halloween Tree by Ray Bradbury

    Eight costumed boys running to meet their friend Pipkin at the haunted house outside town encounter instead the huge and cadaverous Mr. Moundshroud.

    As Pipkin scrambles to join them, he is swept away by a dark Something, and Moundshroud leads the boys on the tail of a kite, through time and space, to search the past for their friend and the meaning of Halloween. 



     

    National Geographic Readers Halloween book cover

    National Geographic Readers: Halloween by Laura F. Marsh

    From visiting the pumpkin patch, to bobbing for apples, to picking out a favorite costume, Halloween is a magical time for young children. The fun and festivities are captured in this book, with full-color illustrations and simple easy-to-grasp text.

    In the spirit of this beloved holiday, this level one reader is sure to captivate and fascinate children.



     

    Halloween Crafts book cover

    Halloween Crafts by Fay Robinson

    Provides information about the origins and customs of Halloween, ideas for celebrating this holiday, and instructions for making a bat sock puppet, a construction paper haunted house, and a treat bag that looks like a coffin.

     

     

     

    Nonfiction

     A History of Halloween book cover

    Trick or Treat: A History of Halloween by Lisa Morton

    Halloween aficionado Lisa Morton provides a thorough history of this spooky day. She begins by looking at how holidays like the Celtic Samhain, a Gaelic harvest festival, have blended with the British Guy Fawkes Day and the Catholic All Souls’ Day to produce the modern Halloween, and explains how the holiday was reborn in America, where costumes and trick-or-treat rituals have become new customs. 

    Morton takes into account the influence of related but independent holidays, especially the Mexican Day of the Dead, as well as the explosion in popularity of haunted attractions and the impact of such events as 9/11 and the economic recession on the celebration today. Trick or Treat also examines the effect Halloween has had on popular culture through the literary works of Washington Irving and Ray Bradbury, films like Halloween and The Nightmare Before Christmas, and television shows such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer and The Simpsons.
     

     From Pagan Ritual to Party Night book cover

    Halloween: From Pagan Ritual to Party Night by Nicholas Rogers

    Drawing on a fascinating array of sources, from classical history to Hollywood films, Rogers traces Halloween as it emerged from the Celtic festival of Samhain (summer's end), picked up elements of the Christian Hallowtide (All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day), arrived in North America as an Irish and Scottish festival, and evolved into an unofficial but large-scale holiday by the early 20th century.

    He examines the 1970s and '80s phenomena of Halloween sadism (razor blades in apples) and inner-city violence (arson in Detroit), as well as the immense influence of the horror film genre on the reinvention of Halloween as a terror-fest.

    Throughout his vivid account, Rogers shows how Halloween remains, at its core, a night of inversion, when social norms are turned upside down, and a temporary freedom of expression reigns supreme. He examines how this very license has prompted censure by the religious right, occasional outrage from law enforcement officials, and appropriation by left-leaning political groups.
     

    Death Makes a Holiday book cover

    Death Makes a Holiday: A Cultural History of Halloween by David J. Skal

    Using a mix of personal anecdotes and brilliant social analysis, Skal examines the amazing phenomenon of Halloween, exploring its dark Celtic history and illuminating why it has evolved—in the course of a few short generations—from a quaint, small-scale celebration into the largest seasonal marketing event outside of Christmas.

    Traveling the country, Skal profiles a wide cross-section of American hard-nosed business men who see Halloween in terms of money; fundamentalists who think it is blasphemous; practicing witches who view it as sacred; and more ordinary men and women who go to extraordinary lengths, on this one night only, to transform themselves and their surroundings into elaborate fantasies.

    Firmly rooted in a deeper cultural and historical analysis, these interviews seek to understand what the various rituals and traditions associated with the holiday have to say about our national psyche.
     

    The Big Book of Halloween book cover

    The Big Book of Halloween: Creative & Creepy Projects for Revellers of All Ages by Laura Dover Doran

    This complete source book is the perfect treat (with lots of tricks, too!) Adults and kids will enjoy the mixture of fun, food, and fright.

    There are 50 great projects and loads of imaginative ideas—everything from decorations to costumes, party ideas to pumpkin-carving patterns. A wealth of Halloween legend and lore help illuminate the holiday’s rich history.

     

     Vintage Holiday Graphics book cover

    Halloween: Vintage Holiday Graphics edited by Jim Heimann

    Trick or treat (smell my feet!) A guaranteed trip down memory lane, this book celebrates All Hallows' Eve in American graphic and print media from the early 1900s to the '60s.

    Featuring witches, ghouls, ghosts, and jack-o-lanterns, the scariest postcards and decorations, and the silliest costumes and candid photos are collected here. With an introduction tracing the unexpected history of Halloween and its traditions, Vintage Halloween is a nostalgic tribute to one of America's favorite holidays.

     

    Dressed for Thrills book cover

    Dressed for Thrills: 100 Years of Halloween Costumes & Masquerade photographs by Phyllis Galembo, text by Mark Alice Durant, foreword by Valerie Steele

    A tour of 100 years of American Halloween attire features a wealth of images depicting revelers and trick-or-treaters in disguise and enhanced by special lighting effects, in a volume complemented by a history of the holiday and Halloween fashion.


     

    A Season with the Witch book cover

    A Season with the Witch: The Magic and Mayhem of Halloween in Salem, Massachusetts by J. W. Ocker

    Salem, Massachusetts may be the strangest city on the planet. A single event in its 400 years of history—the Salem Witch Trials of 1692—transformed it into the Capital of Creepy in America. But Salem is a seasonal town—and its season happens to be Halloween.

    Every October, this small city of 40,000 swells to close to half a million as witches, goblins, ghouls, and ghosts (and their admirers) descend on Essex Street.

    For the fall of 2015, occult enthusiast and Edgar Award–winning writer J.W. Ocker moved his family of four to downtown Salem to experience firsthand a season with the witch, visiting all of its historical sites and macabre attractions. In between, he interviews its leaders and citizens, its entrepreneurs and visitors, its street performers and Wiccans, its psychics and critics, creating a picture of this unique place and the people who revel in, or merely weather, its witchiness.
     

    The Pagan Mysteries of Halloween book cover

    The Pagan Mysteries of Halloween: Celebrating the Dark Half of the Year by Jean Markale

    During the night of Samhain, the Celtic precursor of today's holiday, the borders between life and death were no longer regarded as insurmountable barriers. Two-way traffic was temporarily permitted between this world and the Other World, and the wealth and wisdom of the sidhe, or fairy folk, were available to the intrepid individuals who dared to enter their realm.

    Jean Markale enriches our understanding of how the transition from the light to the dark half of the year was a moment in which time stopped and allowed the participants in the week-long festival to attain a level of consciousness not possible in everyday life, an experience we honor in our modern celebrations of Halloween.
     

    Samhain, Rituals, Recipes & Lore for Halloween book cover

    Samhain, Rituals, Recipes & Lore for Halloweenby Diana Rajchel

    Llewellyn's Sabbat Essentials series explores the old and new ways of celebrating the seasonal rites that are the cornerstones in the witch's year. A well-rounded introduction to Samhain, this attractive book features rituals, recipes, lore, and correspondences.

    It also includes hands-on information for modern celebrations, spells and divination, recipes and crafts, invocations and prayers, and more!


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    Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts

     

    pink cover with a blue illustration of a man's bust

    The bestselling English novelist of The Essex SerpentSarah Perry, stopped by the Library to talk about her newest novel, Melmoth. The books origins lie in an obscure 19th-century Gothic novel of the same name and an illness that upended her life. She discussed how  the earlier novel and her personal experiences combined to birth the phantasmagoric nightmare at the heart of Melmoth's plot.

    Click here to find out how to subscribe and listen to the Library Talks podcast.

     

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    Knowledge Is Power Library Card

    Do you believe Knowledge Is Power? Show the world with your library card.

    Beginning October 29, 2018, The New York Public Library is offering—for a limited time only—a Special Edition library card in all of its locations featuring the timely message Knowledge Is Power.

    Since their inception, public libraries have been at the core of our democracy of informed citizens and have made opportunities available to all people. For well over a century, they have provided the tools that people need to grow, succeed, and be productive members of civil society, proving that knowledge is indeed power. Show your support for that noble mission by signing up to receive the special card.

    Sign up now. With your library card, you can access a whole host of free things: millions of books, newspapers, and databases; the Library’s world-renowned research collections; free passes to over 40 cultural organizations; streaming documentaries; and online classes, just to name a few.

    Act fast: the Knowledge Is Power card is available on a first come, first served basis in extremely limited quantities at NYPL locations in the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island.

    New NYPL Cardholders

    Apply in person at your local NYPL branch, or sign up online and visit your local branch quickly to validate and pick up your Special Edition card before they run out. Knowledge Is Power cards are free for new cardholders. Library card applicants must show proof that you live, work, attend school, or pay property taxes in New York State.

    Existing NYPL Cardholders

    Existing NYPL cardholders can pay the card replacement fee of $1 to get the Knowledge Is Power card.

    Show Your Support with #KnowledgeIsPower

    Share photos of your card on social media with the hashtag #KnowledgeIsPower. NYPL will share photos on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

     


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    The Library After Hours
    The Library After Hours: Picture This November 30 | 7–10 PM

    Welcome to our bi-weekly update on events happening during the next two weeks at The New York Public Library. With 92 locations across New York City, there's a lot going on! We're highlighting some of our events here, including author talks, free classes, community art shows, performances, concerts, and exhibitions—and you can always find more at nypl.org/events. If you want to receive our round-up in your inbox, sign up here. We look forward to seeing you at the Library soon. 

    Selected Events
     

    Social Justice: The Musical
    Two documentaries, Black Fiddler and Gee, Officer Krupke, will frame a panel discussion on race, class, cultural appropriation and the use of Jerome Robbins' work to navigate social issues.
    Monday, November 5 | 6 PM
    Library for the Performing Arts

    Mid-Sentence—Celebrating Lucia Berlin
    To mark the publication of two posthumous works by acclaimed writer Lucia Berlin, a panel of her fans, including Karah Preiss, Wayne Koestenbaum, Ruth Franklin, and John Williams, gather to discuss the impact of her work and legacy.
    Wednesday, November 7 | 6:30 PM
    Mid-Manhattan Library at 42nd Street

    LIVE from the NYPL: Teju Cole and Ishion Hutchinson
    Whether writing his New York Times magazine column "On Photography," novels, essays, or curating his Instagram feed, images rendered in film and in language are central to Teju Cole’s work. The same can be said of award-winning poet Ishion Hutchinson's use of images in verse. With a mutual admiration for each other’s work, the two meet for a conversation about their shared themes of place, memory, and the notion of home.
    Thursday, November 8 | 7 PM
    Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

    Schomburg Open House: Passport to Black History
    Join the Schomburg Center for this great opportunity to meet librarians, archivists, and curators. Attend programs, visit current exhibitions, use the special collections, and more.
    Saturday, November 10 | 12 Noon
    Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

    Irregular Order: How Congress Really Works
    Learn about the inner workings of Congress from Washington insiders and journalists from ProPublica and the Washington Post as their joint series "Irregular Order" comes to life in an interactive conversation at the Library.
    Thursday, November 13 | 6:30 PM
    Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

    Editorial Guidance: Mary-Kay Wilmers with Andrew O'Hagan
    Mary-Kay Wilmers, veteran editor of the London Review of Books, gives a candid interview about her career and her own writing. She will speak with novelist and essayist Andrew O'Hagan about her decades at the forefront of the English literary world.
    Wednesday, November 14 | 6:30 PM
    Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

    The Library After Hours: Picture This
    The city's most cerebral happy hour turns the clock back to the 1840s for a night of art, science, and a celebration of early photographic pioneer Anna Atkins. Join us for an array of crafts, talks, and activities that look back to photography’s past and gaze forward into the medium’s future.
    Friday, November 30 | 7 PM
    Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

    Business, Career & Finance


    Self-Recruiter® Lecture Series: Resume Renovation
    John Crant discusses the importance of revamping your resume to stand out during your job search.
    Wednesday, October 31 | 6 PM
    Science, Industry and Business Library

    Start and Grow Your Business with Mintel
    Learn about this great eletronic resource that provides information on consumers' trends and patterns.
    Tuesday, November 6 | 6 PM
    Science, Industry and Business Library

    Smart Tax Planning Moves to Make Before Year End
    Financial professional Dan Olson helps you to understand the new Tax Reform changes and how they affect you.
    Thursday, November 8 | 3 PM
    Science, Industry and Business Library

    More Events


    Scared to Death: The Art of a Good Mystery
    Wednesday, October 31 | 6:30 PM
    Mid-Manhattan Library at 42nd Street

    When East Meets West in New York City
    Thursday, November 1 | 6 PM
    Library for the Performing Arts

    Anna Atkins Symposium
    Saturday, November 3 | 9:30 AM
    Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

    Meet the Artist: Katherine Hubbard
    Tuesday, November 6 | 12:30 PM
    Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

    Immigrant Writing Workshops with Restless Books
    Thursdays in November | 2 PM
    Mid-Manhattan Library at 42nd Street

    Crafting the Collections: Sun Print Workshops for Beginners
    November and December
    Various NYPL Locations

    TechConnect


    Technology Programs and Classes
    TechConnect offers more than 80 technology classes at libraries throughout the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island—all for free! There are classes for all students from beginner to advanced, including series courses for those who want more in-depth knowledge.

    Upcoming Events


    Barren Island: Carol Zoref
    Wednesday, November 14 | 5:30 PM
    Webster Library

    Invisible: Stephen L. Carter
    Wednesday, November 14 | 6:30 PM
    Mid-Manhattan Library at 42nd Street

    Who Owns the Word?
    Thursday, November 15 | 6:30 PM
    Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

    Irregular Order
    Monday, November 19 | 6:30 PM
    Bronx Library Center

    Mid Sentence | Those Who Knew: Idra Novey with Hernán Diaz
    Monday, November 19 | 6:30 PM
    Mid-Manhattan Library at 42nd Street


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    NYPL Insta Novels The Raven

    As the clock struck midnight on Halloween, The New York Public Library released a surprise edition of Insta Novels: “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe. This version of the classic poem was illustrated by Studio Aka (@studioaka) and is available to read on the Library's Instagram account  (@nypl).

    Insta Novels reimagine Instagram’s Stories feature as a way to provide a new platform for some of the most iconic stories ever written. They were first launched in August 2018 with a digital version of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, illustrated by Magoz (@magoz). In October, Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s short story "The Yellow Wallpaper," illustrated by Buck (@buck_design), was released to read on the Library's Instagram account. The program, created by independent advertising and creative agency Mother in New York and developed in partnership with the Library, aims to make these stories more widely available, reach new audiences, and turn a space for fleeting interactions into one for immersive reading.
     

    How to Read "The Raven" on Instagram

    First, go to the Library's Instagram account (@nypl) and tap "The Raven" in the highlights section, right under the bio.

    Rest your thumb on lower right part of the screen to hold the page, and lift your thumb to turn the page. (The lower right thumb holder is designed to double as a flip book: if you lift your thumb and let the pages flip, you'll see an animation.)

    Did you miss the previous Insta Novels of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland or "The Yellow Wallpaper?" You can still read the Insta Novel editions by locating them on our virtual bookshelf in the highlights section of the Library's Instagram account (@nypl).

    If you don't have Instagram or want to explore other ways to read "The Raven" this Halloween, check out these other ways to read the poem.

    "The Raven" Readalikes

    If you like "The Raven," you may enjoy these creepy poems, short stories, and novellas by authors old and new.

    “Because I Could Not Stop for Death” and other poems in the Collected Poems of Emily Dickinson

    The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes

    The Best of Richard Matheson

    The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor Lavalle

    Dark Tales by Shirley Jackson

    In the Footsteps of Dracula: Tales of the Undead Count, ed. by Stephen Jones
     

    Quiz

     

     

     

    Explore Poe at NYPL

    at the window
    "At the Window" illustration from "The Raven" via NYPL Digital Collections

    Our Print Collectionis home to an illustrated edition of “The Raven.” This one has been digitized, and can be viewed as part of our Digital Collections. The lithographs are by artist Edouard Manet, and were created in 1875.
     

    Halloween Books for Kids

    Before delving deep into the genre that surrounds the spooky day known as Halloween, why not learn how it all began? After that, look through our creepy guide to some spine-chilling children’s horror books. Parents, beware—some of these books might even have you squirming in your seat! Need more than just words to put you in the Halloween mood? Check out some spooky picture books as we remember the popular cartoonist Charles Addams, creator of the eccentric Addams Family. After you carve your own NYPL pumpkin pull some last minute costume ideas from our curation of DIY costume books. Happy scaring!
     

    Other Halloween Reads for Adults

    Start off your Halloween by learning about the very real events of the Salem Witch Trials. Now, if you’re looking for some truly horrifying books, look no further than  the genre of gothic horror. Maybe you enjoy more emotion in your horror? Gothic romance has got what you want. (Because let’s be honest, love can be a little scary sometimes, too.) For our adolescent horror fans look for a contemporary young adult gothic fiction story. Growing up is scary, wouldn’t you agree? But what could be more scary than having the place where you sleep be haunted! To drown out the sounds of the ghouls and monsters listen to The Librarian Is In Podcast for some professional advice on how to stay in the spooky mood. Have fun sleeping with one eye open.
     

    Read on SimplyE from The New York Public Library

    The stories featured on Insta Novels are also available on SimplyE, The New York Public Library's free e-reader app, available on the App Store or Google Play.

    Anyone can browse classic titles, including "The Raven," "The Yellow Wallpaper," Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and The Metamorphosis, in the SimplyE Collection in the app. Those eligible for library cards from The New York Public Library can also access 300,000+ e-books, from bestellers to classics, by connecting to NYPL in the app.
     

    Other Ways to Read the Stories

    There are many ways to read or listen to "The Raven," “The Yellow Wallpaper," Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and The Metamorphosis. Anyone can access the full texts of the stories on the Project Gutenberg website. NYPL cardholders can check out the books and audiobooks via the NYPL catalog. Also, you can find many of the stories by searching the online catalog of NYPL's Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library.


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    Listen on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts

     

    It's almost Election Day. Do you know where your voting rights are? Christopher Famighetti, professor at Jefferson Market University, joins Frank and Gwen for an in-depth convo about voting — and what libraries have to do with it. Plus: a different take on Tolstoy and the surreal films of Luis Buñuel.

    voter registration
    Frank and Nancy, taking to the streets to support democracy and register voters! 

     

    Guest Star: Christopher Famighetti

    Jefferson Market University's fall classes (stay tuned for the spring schedule!)

    Find a class on voting, history or information literacy at NYPL, and check out our past voter registration efforts

    A Confession by Leo Tolstoy

    The Exterminating Angel by Luis Buñuel — and here it is, streaming online, via Kanopy

    VOTE! Find your polling place and figure out what's on your local ballot. If you need help, Ask NYPL!

    ---

    How to listen to The Librarian Is In

    Subscribing to The Librarian Is In on your mobile device is the easiest way to make sure you never miss an episode. Episodes will automatically download to your device, and be ready for listening every other Thursday morning

    On your iPhone or iPad:
    Open the purple “Podcasts” app that’s preloaded on your phone. If you’re reading this on your device, tap this link to go straight to the show and click “Subscribe.” You can also tap the magnifying glass in the app and search for “The New York Public Library Podcast.”

    On your Android phone or tablet:
    Open the orange “Play Music” app that’s preloaded on your device. If you’re reading this on your device, click this link to go straight to the show and click “Subscribe.” You can also tap the magnifying glass icon and search for “The New York Public Library Podcast.” 

    Or if you have another preferred podcast player, you can find “The New York Public Library Podcast” there. (Here’s the RSS feed.)

    From a desktop or laptop:
    Click the “play” button above to start the show. Make sure to keep that window open on your browser if you’re doing other things, or else the audio will stop. You can always find the latest episode at nypl.org/podcast.


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    voter

    Election Day is Tuesday, November 6, 2018, and The New York Public Library is here to help you find all of the resources you need to be an informed voter. 

    Here is what you'll need to know to go out and vote.

    U.S. Capitol. Image ID: g90f091_015f
    U.S. Capitol. Image ID: g90f091_015f

    Voter Registration

    While the voter registration deadline for the 2018 midterm election has already passed, it's never to early to register for the next election. 

    To register to vote in the City of New York, you must:

    •     Be a citizen of the United States (Includes those persons born in Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands).
    •     Be a New York City resident for at least 30 days.
    •     Be 18 years of age before the next election.
    •     Not be serving a jail sentence or be on parole for a felony conviction.
    •     Not be adjudged mentally incompetent by a court.
    •     Not claim the right to vote elsewhere (outside the City of New York).

    Register to vote in New York for the first time, or update name, address, or party affiliation:

    In Person • By Mail • Online

    Registration Status

    Not sure if you're registered? Check voter status at NYSVoter Public Information - Voter Registration Search.

    NYS's Voter Bill of Rights from LWVNY.org

    Sample ballot for a given address available through nyc.gov
    Sample ballot for a given address available through Poll Site Locator

    Find Your Polling Place

    Find Your Districts 
and Current Representatives

    Who Represents Me? from the Graduate Center, City University of New York by the Center for Urban Research in partnership with the League of Women Voters of the City of New York, will help you identify your reps.
    Enter your address to find your local, state, and federal representatives.

    Federal: The White HouseU.S. SenateU.S. House of Representatives

    State: NY State GovernorNY State Attorney GeneralNew York State ComptrollerNew York State SenateNew York State Assembly

    City-Wide:New York City MayorNew York City Public AdvocateNew York City ComptrollerNew York City Council

    Boroughs :Bronx Borough PresidentBronx District AttorneyBrooklyn Borough President • Brooklyn District Attorney • Manhattan Borough PresidentManhattan District AttorneyQueens Borough President • Queens District Attorney • Staten Island Borough PresidentStaten Island District Attorney

    Research the Issues

    Vote Smart bills itself as "the voter's self-defense system." It contains voting records, biographies, issue positions, interest group ratings, speeches, and campaign finances for all politicians. It also features "VoteEasy," a tool that lets you compare your personal views to those of candidates running for office.

    Compare and contrast with Project Vote Smart's VoteEasy

    Factcheck.org, a project of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania, is a nonpartisan, nonprofit consumer advocate for voters that aims "to reduce the level of deception and confusion in U.S. politics." The site monitors the factual accuracy of what is said by major U.S. political players in the form of TV ads, debates, speeches, interviews, and news releases.

    Public Agenda aims to help communities and the nation solve tough problems through research, engagement, and communication.

    The Opposing Viewpoints series (available in print and online with your library card) contains information on nearly 5,000 current social topics in the form of primary source documents, statistics, websites, and multimedia.

    Research the Candidates & Ballot Proposals 

    New York City Campaign Finance Board 2018 Voter Guide is the guide from the Campaign Finance Board, a "nonpartisan, independent city agency that enhances the role of New York City residents in elections. The CFB’s mission is to increase voter participation and awareness, provide campaign finance information to the public, enable more citizens to run for office, strengthen the role of small contributors, and reduce the potential for actual or perceived corruption."

    Compare platforms side by side and make yourself a cheat sheet to take to the polls with Vote411
    Compare platforms side by side and make yourself a cheat sheet to take to the polls with Vote411

    Vote411, the online voters' guide from the League of Women Voters, allows you to type in your address to see the races on your ballot. Candidates' positions can be compared side-by-side, and you may print out your preferences as a reminder and take it with you to the polls on Election Day.

    The Internet Archive launched TV News Search and Borrow in 2012 "to enhance the capabilities of journalists, scholars, teachers, librarians, civic organizations, and other engaged citizens" by repurposing closed captioning "to enable users to search, quote and borrow U.S. TV news programs." It contains 1,074,000 news programs collected over 4+ years from national U.S. networks and stations in San Francisco and Washington D.C.

    Research Campaign Finance and Government Information

    The Federal Election Commission "administers and enforces the Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA) - the statute that governs the financing of federal elections. The duties of the FEC, which is an independent regulatory agency, are to disclose campaign finance information, to enforce the provisions of the law such as the limits and prohibitions on contributions, and to oversee the public funding of Presidential elections."

    OpenSecrets.org: Center for Responsive Politics is "a nonpartisan guide to money's influence on U.S. elections and public policy."

    NYOpenGovernment.com is an effort by the state Attorney General’s office to "promote citizens' right to know and to monitor governmental decision-making. It allows you to easily access statewide government information, which until now has been scattered or difficult to retrieve."

    The Sunlight Foundation has numerous project websites and apps to help you track influence, discover the inner workings of congress, and track legislation and public policy.

    Follow the Money: The National Institute on Money in State Politics is a "nonpartisan, nonprofit organization revealing the influence of campaign money on state-level elections and public policy in all 50 states. Provides a campaign-finance database and issue analyses." Encourages "transparency and promotes independent investigation of state-level campaign contributions by journalists, academic researchers, public-interest groups, government agencies, policymakers, students, and the public at large."

    Congressional Universe Database provides comprehensive access to U.S. legislative information from Congressional Information Service, Inc. and is available on-site at the research libraries. Contains Congressional Publications, Legislative Histories, Bills & Laws, Members & Committees, Regulations, and Daily Congressional Record & Rules.

    Podcasts to Inspire and Inform

    Subscribe to the Library's podcasts for special episodes about the history of elections and current debates on voting and voter supression. 



     

    Find Election Results

    FederalNew York StateNew York City

    White House, North Front. Image ID: g90f098_008f
    White House, North Front. Image ID: g90f098_008f

     

    These resources and information are adapted from Election 2016: Register, Research, and Vote by Lauren Lampasone. 


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    Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts

     

    "Voter suppression is designed to demoralize the electorate — to make people believe that it doesn't matter, that the system is rigged, your vote doesn't count. That is a false narrative"  - Carol Anderson

    pink cover with a blue illustration of a man's bust

    Carol Anderson is a historian and educator, and the author of White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of our Racial Divide (2016). Her latest book is One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy. It is a timely survey of the methods by which voting rights have been rolled back in this country following the 2013 Supreme Court decision in Shelby County v. Holder. Anderson exposes efforts at racially biased voter suppression, from photo ID requirement to gerrymandering to poll closures. One Person, No Vote is a clarion call to understand the reality of contemporary American electoral politics and the actual disenfranchisement of our citizens today.

    Anderson spoke about her book with Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, a professor of History, Race and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School and former Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

     

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    Each year, the United States recognizes September 15 through October 15 as Hispanic Heritage Month. In recognition of the significant contributions Hispanic women have made to the labor force, here are six statistics demonstrating their growing influence as drivers of economic productivity and entrepreneurs.

    Strong labor force participation

    • In 2016, there were 11.4 million Hispanic women in the civilian labor force. That’s one in seven women, and 7.2 percent of the total labor force.
    • By 2024, the number of Hispanic women participating in the workforce is projected to increase to almost 14 million, or 8.5 percent of the total labor force.
    • Nearly one out of three Hispanic women were employed in service occupations in 2016, but managerial and professional occupations have had the largest increase in Hispanic women’s representation since 2000, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

    A spirit of entrepreneurship

    Entrepreneurship among Hispanic women also has grown. In 2012, the most recent year for which data is available:

    • About one out of every seven women-owned businesses was owned by a Hispanic woman.
    • Forty-four percent of all Hispanic-owned businesses were owned by women, up from 34 percent in 2002.
    • In 2012, Hispanic women-owned businesses generated $78.7 billion in sales and employed more than 470,000 people.

    You can learn more about Hispanic women making an important and growing contribution to the U. S. workforce from the Department of Labor Women's Bureau blog post By the Numbers:  Hispanic Women in the Workforce, written by Tracie Sanchez, program analyst.

    Employment Programs

    The nation's largest public library system, The New York Public Library, is hiring! Browse our Careers page for all sorts of open positions and discover jobs across our 92 locations in the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island.

    NYPD is hiring Traffic Enforcement Agents.  Information session is open to the public on November 7 at  6:30 PM at the Municipal Credit Union (1560 Flatbush Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11210.) Just walk in!  Traffic Enforcement Agents are assigned to the Police Academy for a period of 10 to 11 weeks.  They start receiving pay and benefits from their first day of Recruit training.  For more information, call 212 - RECRUIT.

    CUNY TechWorks and The Borough of Manhattan Community College Center for Continuing Education and Workforce Development are now offering qualified participants a "no cost" 22-week computer training program in Computer Netwotk Support. As IT jobs continue to grow, the need for people to learn the latest technology and become certified as skilled professionals remains in high demand. To prepare for today's competitive workforce, students will go through a series of career development workshops in soft skills training, resume preparation, and mock interviews. Participants  will meet industry leaders and graduates of this program, who will share best practices on how to be successful in the IT field. Upon completion of the training, students can earn four college credits towards their associate's degree and graduates will be referred to jobs.   The next session begins in January 2019.  For more information call 212 - 346 - 8410 / 8420.

    Better Business Bureau (BBB) presents BBB Live X1: BBB invites bilingual volunteers for a Consumer Protection "Call-In" Program, Protecting Yourself from Work-at-Home Scams, on Wednesday, November 14, 2018 at BBB Office, 30 East 33 Street, 12th Floor, Manhattan. Volunteer for one or more of the two call-answering shifts: 2 PM-7 PM and 3 PM-8 PM. Refreshments, resources, and training will be provided. Calls will be answered in Spanish, and each shift begins with training in English. It is especially important to have trained volunteers in place and ready to help callers from 5 PM to 7:30 PM, when most calls will come in. BBB is happy to work with volunteers on shift timing and length. For more information, please contact Luana Lewis at 212-358-2842 or email llewis@newyork.bbb.org See more details and sign up here.

    Community, Culture and Technology Fair: Wednesday, November 7, 12:30 PM-5:00 PM at the New York Public Library Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, Celeste Bartos Forum, entrance on 42nd Street, west of 5th Avenue. The Fair will include: cultural institutions plus educational, employment, advocacy, arts, recreation, technology, and support organizations; fun, accessible art activities and demonstrations of new adaptive technology; speakers on employment resources; individual consultations and headshots. Many of the tablers will have information on this year's added theme of employment, volunteering, and skills-building. Verbally described touch tours of the historic Stephen A. Schwarzman building will be offered at 2:15 PM and 4:15 PM. ASL interpretation and real-time (CART) captioning available upon request; please submit yours at least two weeks in advance, by emailing accessibility@nypl.org

    ApprenticeNYC for CNC Machinists. ApprenticeNYC is a paid full-time apprenticeship opportunity that provides classroom-based technical training and on-the-job training to help New York City job seekers develop in-demand skills in a long-term occupation with high growth potential. The computer numerically controlled (CNC) machinist track of the program provides 10 weeks of classroom training and 62 weeks of on-the-job training with employers in the advanced manufacturing sector. No experience necessary. Complete this program application form to be considered for the opportunity.

    Apply for an Individual Training Grant (ITG). The grant pays for tuition, registration fees, testing fees, and books for in-demand trainings. ITGs are only available for training in certain occupations and at eligible training providers. Find out more about eligible occupations and training providers.

    NYC Small Business Services work with the New York Alliance for Careers in Healthcare (NYACH), the city's healthcare industry partnership, and the Workforce 1 Healthcare Career Center, to offer no-cost training programs that prepare New Yorkers for jobs in the healthcare field. With NYACH, NYC Small Businesss Services engage employers, educational institutions,  training providers, and other partners in designing training programs that provide the required skills and credentials for viable healthcare career opportunities. Opportunites are available for those interested in ambulatory care and acute care. 

    Bronx Educational Opportunity Center Security Guard Training: Registration (see details here) is Mondays and Wednesdays, 8:30 AM-11:00 AM (except holidays). Now accepting applications. The calendar of classes is available here.

    Brooklyn Networks is a free, six-week training program that helps unemployed and underemployed individuals access career in low-voltage cabling. The course prepares graduates to obtain the industry-recognized BICSI credential, followed by work in fields like voice and data cabling, security system installation, broadcast cabling, and A/V system installation. For more information, call 718-237-2017 x 149 and attend an information session.

    The Cooper Union Retraining Program for Immigrant Engineers at CAMBA assists underemployed or unemployed immigrant engineers and IT professionals in gaining access to higher-paying  jobs through training and job placement assistance. The program includes night and weekend courses in information technology and chemical, mechanical, electrical, and civil engineering, taught by Cooper Union faculty and field experts. Since its inception in 1987, the Retraining Program for Immigrant Engineers has placed 3,000 immigrant engineers into careers.

    YearUp aligns job training with corporate partner needs and market trends to ensure the skills students learn will be in demand. Learn valuable technical and professional skills, and gain work experience during internships at top companies. Earn a stipend throughout the program (while you train and during your internship) and complete courses eligible for college credits.

    Under the America's Promise CUNY TechWorks Program, Queensborough Community College (QCC) offers an Applied Software Development Training Program covering web client programming, systems design and implementation, and smartphone application development. This hands-on, tech skills training program culminates in a capstone application development class focused on building students' professional programming portfolios. Credits earned can be applied towards QCC's AAS degree in Information and Internet Technology. For more information, call 718-631-6343.   

    The CUNY Fatherhood Academy at LaGuardia Community College is  now recruiting for their September cohort. This free program is for unemployed and underemployed fathers between the ages of 18 and 30. For more information, get details here or call 718-730-7336.

    Rebuilding Together NYC Construction Skills Training is now available. For information, call 718-488-8840, x18.

    Discover Accounting includes state-by-state guides on becoming a CPA, salaries, and educational requirements. If you are looking for more advanced accounting topics, you'll find information in their comprehensive career guide and career comparisons.

    New York City Career Center Events and Recruiting

    For specific information on all career events in NYC this week, please search the New York State Department of Labor Career Center Events.

    Upgrade a Resume Workshop: Monday, November 5, 2016, 1 PM-3:30 PM at Bronx Workforce 1 Career Center, 400 East Fordham Road, 8th floor, Bronx, NY 10458. This workshop walks job seekers through the steps for upgrading their resumes and provides intensive one-on-one feedback on each paticipant's resume. Customers must have an electronic version of their resume available either in their email or on a flash drive, in PDF form. Duration: two hours.  Check-in time: 1:00PM-1:30 PM. For information, call 718-960-2458.

    Interviewing Workshop Spanish: Monday, November 5, 2018, 2 PM-4:15 PM at Bronx Workforce 1 Career Center, 400 East Fordham Road, 8th floor, Bronx, NY 10458. Check-in: 2:00 PM-2:15 PM. For information, call 718-960-7901.

    Job Search Planning Workshop (English): Tuesday, November 6, 2018, 2 PM-4:15 PM at Bronx Workforce 1 Career Center, 400 East Fordham Road, 8th floor, Bronx, NY 10458. Participants will learn or improve job search skills that can help in their job search process. Check-in time: 2:00 PM-2:15 PM. For information, call 718-960-7901.

    Bronx Mini Job Fair:  Wednesday, November 7,  2018, 10 AM - 1 PM, at Bronx  Workforce 1 Career Center, 400 East Fordham Rd., 7th floor, Bronx, NY 10458.  Participating businesses:  YMCA of Greater New York, Sprint United Management, US Census Bureau.  For information call 917 - 763 - 9670.

    Harlem Mini Job Fair:  Wednesday, November 7, 2018, 10 AM - 1 PM, at NYC Workforce 1 Career Center, 215 West 125th Street, 6th floor.  (Between 7th & 8th Ave.), New York, NY 10027.  Participating businesses:  US Census Bureau, FedEx (Randstad Sourceright), The TemPositions Group of Companies, Scotts Miracle Grow, Defender Security Services, Inc.

    Benefits of Exploring Job Zone Workshop: Wednesday, November 7, 2018, 2 PM-4:15 PM at Bronx Workforce 1 Career Center, 400 East Fordham Road, 8th floor, Bronx, NY 10458. Participants will learn and explore how to use Job Zone, an interactive resource, to help manage their careers. Check-in time: 2:00 PM-2:15 PM. For information, call 718-960-7901.

    Individual Resume Review / Career Advisement Workshop: Thursday, November 8, 2018, 12:30 PM-3 PM at Bronx Workforce 1 Career Center, 400 East Fordham Road, 8th floor, Bronx, NY 10458. Check-in time: 12:30 PM-1:00 PM.  For information, call 718-960-2458.

    Basic Resume Writing Workshop: Thursday, November 8, 2018, 1:30 PM-3 PM at Brooklyn Workforce 1 Career Center, 250 Schermerhorn Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201. Participants will learn the purpose of a resume, and chronological and combination resumes, and select the appropriate type for their specific needs.

    Create a Resume Workshop: Friday, November 9, 2018, 1 PM-3:30 PM at Bronx Workforce 1 Career Center, 400 East Fordham Road, 8th floor, Bronx, NY 10458. This workshop is designed to walk job seekers through the steps for building an effective resume, which is a critical component of getting a job. Must have knowledge of computer use. Duration: two hours. Check-in: 1:00 PM-1:30 PM. For information, call 718-960-2458.

    Create a Resume Workshop (Spanish): Friday, November 9, 2018, 8:45 AM-11 AM at Bronx Workforce 1 Career Center, 400 East Fordham Road, 8th floor, Bronx, NY 10458. This workshop is designed to walk job seekers through the steps for building an effective resume, which is a critical component of getting a  job. Duration: two hours. Check-in: 8:45 AM-9:00AM.

    Job Postings and AssistanceJob Fair Sign-up Table

    Job Postings at New York City Workforce 1.

    Apprenticeship Opportunities in New York City.

    Available jobs via Brooklyn Community Board 14.

    The New York City Employment and Training Coalition (NYCE&TC) is an association of 200 community-based organizations, educational institutions, and labor unions that annually provide job training and employment services to over 750,000 New Yorkers, including welfare recipients, unemployed workers, low-wage workers, at-risk youth, the formerly incarcerated, immigrants and the mentally and physically disabled. View NYCE&TC Job Listings.

    Digital NYC is the official online hub of the New York City startup and technology ecosystem, bringing together every company, startup, investor, event, job, class, blog, video, workplace, accelerator, incubator, resource, and organization in the five boroughs. Search jobs by category on this site.

    St. Nicks Alliance Workforce Development provides free job training and educational programs in Environmental Response and Remediation Tec (ERRT), Commercial Driver's License, Pest Control Technician Training (PCT), Employment Search, Prep Training and Job Placement, Earn Benefits, and Career Path Center. For information and assistance, please visit St. Nicks Alliance Workforce Development or call 718-302-2057 ext. 202.

    Brooklyn Workforce Innovations helps jobless and working poor New Yorkers establish careers in sectors that offer good wages and opportunities for advancement. Currently, BWI offers free job training programs in four industries: commercial driving, telecommunications cable installation, TV and film production, and skilled woodworking.

    CMP (formerly Chinatown Manpower Project) in lower Manhattan is now recruiting for free training in Quickbooks, Basic Accounting, and Excel. This training is open to anyone receiving food stamps but no cash assistance. Classes run for eight weeks, followed by one-on-one meetings with a job developer.

    CMP also provides Free Home Health Aide Training for bilingual English/Cantonese speakers receiving food stamps but no cash assistance. Training runs Mondays through Fridays for six weeks, and includes test prep and the HHA certification exam. Students learn about direct care techniques such as taking vital signs, and assisting with personal hygiene and nutrition.

    For more information on the above CMP training programs, email info@cmpny.org, call 212-571-1690, or visit the CMP website. CMP also provides tuition-based healthcare and business training free to students who are entitled to ACCESS funding.

    Nontraditional Employment for Women (NEW) trains women, and places them in careers in the skilled construction, utility, and maintenance trades. It helps women achieve economic independence and a secure future. For information call 212-627-6252, or register online.

    Grace Institute provides tuition-free, practical job training in a supportive learning community for underserved New York area women of all ages, and from many different backgrounds. For information, call 212-832-7605.
     

    Please note that this page will be revised when more recruitment events for the week of November 4 become available.


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    Women running at mile 7 of the 2015 New York City Marathon
    Elite women runners at mile 7 of the 2015 TCS NYC Marathon.Via Flickr, Creative Commons
    Taken by S. Pisano
    An assortment of 4 photos from the 1979 New York City Marathon, on a brown background
    NYC Marathon, 1979. Manhattan,1st Ave., between 76th and 77th Streets. Irma and Paul Milstein Division of United States History, Local History and Genealogy; NYPL Digital Collections, Image ID: 732890F

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    With only a few days until the 2018 TCS New York City Marathon, posters have been placed throughout the NYC subway, stating: #itwillmoveyou, #itwillfreeyou, #itwillenergizeyou, #itwillwelcomeyou, and more. 

    The sentiments are not exaggerating. 26.2 miles is no joke and is often presented as the distance runner’s ultimate goal. If they have prepped properly, runners will have dedicated countless hours to running hundreds of miles during the spring and summer to make sure they can cross that finish line strong—no matter if they're a novice or professional. 

    Often, the struggle really is endurance—pushing the body to its limits, to run and go. This requires pacing, training, a lot of understanding of your own body and, quite frankly, external encouragement. This can range from your go-to music playlist, to movies on the treadmill at the gym when the weather gets too cold, to changing up the scenery to engage with the city in a way no one else does. 

    For my training for the TCS New York City Marathon, I listen to a Spotify playlist that I’ve built upon since I started running. But for those long runs that come with increased mileage, 125-beats-per-minute for more than two to three hours has energized me so much that I would start out way too fast, my efforts petering out in the end, leaving me unable to finish my goal for that day. 

    What has really helped the miles go by and kept me on a consistent, even pace, has been e-audiobooks. 

    As a "run-brarian" (yes, okay, a combination of runner and librarian), I couldn’t believe how proud I was to combine two of my favorite things in one effort. But not every audiobook is created equal! Sometimes, your own preferences may not jive with the voice actor reading your book—try not to judge whether you like the book based on that, especially if it has been on your to-read list for some time. 

    In the list below, I've included e-audiobooks I’ve listened to and found to have: 1. good, even profound stories, and 2. really engaging audio. These include fiction and nonfiction, adult and young adult. I have laughed out loud and even cried on my run with some of these selections. (Summaries adapted from the publishers.)

    Runners and fellow run-brarians? See you out there at the finish line in Central Park on November 4.  

    Recommended E-audiobooks for a Runner's Playlist

    Between the World and Me

    Between the World and Me

    By Ta-Nehisi Coates
    Read by the author

    Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a framework for understanding our nation's history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of "race," a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden?
     
    This is Coates's attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son—and readers—the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children's lives were taken as American plunder.
     
    Furiously Happy

    Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things

    By Jenny Lawson
    Read by the author

    It's the difference between surviving life and living life. It's the difference between taking a shower and teaching your monkey butler how to shampoo your hair. Jenny Lawson—aka The Bloggess—returns with the follow-up to her bestselling memoir, Let's Pretend This Never Happened, recounting stories from everyday family life in her inimitably frank, hilarious, bizarre and endearing way.

    She describes her battles with depression and anxiety, and her quest to overcome them by saying 'yes' to even the absurdist opportunities and making the good times gloriously good. As Jenny says, "You can't experience pain without also experiencing the baffling and ridiculous moments of being fiercely, unapologetically, intensely and (above all) furiously happy…" It's a philosophy that has—quite literally—saved her life.

    Flying Lessons & Other Stories

    Flying Lessons & Other Stories 

    Edited by Ellen Oh
    Read by various narrators

    From basketball dreams and family fiascos to first crushes and new neighborhoods, this anthology, written by award-winning children's authors, celebrates the uniqueness and universality in all of us.

     

    America is Not the Heart

    America is Not the Heart

    By Elaine Castillo
    Read by Donnabella Mortel

    How many lives fit in a lifetime? When Hero De Vera arrives in America—haunted by the political upheaval in the Philippines and disowned by her parents—she's already on her third.

    Her uncle gives her a fresh start in the Bay Area and doesn't ask about her past… His younger wife knows enough about the might and secrecy of the De Vera family to keep her head down. But their daughter—the first American-born daughter in the family—can't resist asking Hero about her damaged hands.
     
    I Have the Right To

    I Have the Right To: A High School Survivor's Story of Sexual Assault, Justice, and Hope

    By Chessy Prout
    Read by the author

    The numbers are staggering: nearly one in five girls ages 14 to 17 have been the victim of a sexual assault or attempted sexual assault. This is the true story of one of those girls.

    In 2014, Prout was a freshman at St. Paul's School, a prestigious boarding school in New Hampshire, when a senior boy sexually assaulted her as part of a ritualized game of conquest. She reported her assault to the police and testified against her attacker in court. In the face of unexpected backlash from her once-trusted school community, she shed her anonymity to help other survivors find their voice.

    Heretics Anonymous

    Heretics Anonymous

    By Katie Henry
    Read by Michael Crouch

    When non-believer Michael transfers to a Catholic school in 11th grade, he quickly connects with a secret support group intent on exposing the school's hypocrisies, one stunt at a time.

     

     


     

    Interested in following a runner during the marathon? Download the TCS NYC Marathon app and keep track of your favorite athletes and friends. 


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    This award—given jointly by The New York Public Library and The New York Times—honors the unimaginably talented illustrators who give kids yet another reason to love reading. We couldn’t be more excited about this collaboration or more proud of this list of gorgeous picture books. 

    Make sure you check out the NYT's slideshow of the artists at work in their studios and the beautiful images from the books on their site.

    And if you can't wait to get your hands on these beauties, you know what to do: Sign up for a library card! All these books are available to check out from the Library.

    The 2018 winners are:

    forest

    The Forest, written by Riccardo Bozzi and illustrated by Violeta Lopiz and Valerio Vidali

    The NYPL/NYT judges called this story about a creepy forest walk a "thrilling visual excursion," thanks to creative die-cuts and embossings
    .

    our car

    Our Car, written by J.M. Brum and illustrated by Jan Bajtlik

    A Polish artist paired delightfully bold and bright images with this unusual vehicle story—written by a mechanic!

     

    run wild

    Run Wild, written and illustrated by David Covell

    Handwritten lettering lends an excited, dashed-off, whimsical feel to a tale about the joy and exhileration of running and exploring. 

     

    visitor

    The Visitor, written and illustrated by Antje Damm

    To create these fantastic illustrations, Damm drew her characters, cut them out, posed them in a tiny house made of paper and cardboard, and then photographed them. 

     
    house that once was

    A House that Once Was, written by Julie Fogliano and illustrated by Lane Smith

    The artwork delineates the two different sections of this picture book about children exploring a seemingly abandoned house, going from hectic splatters when the kids are inquisitive to muted collage when they calm down.

     

    monster

    She Made a Monster: How Mary Shelley Created Frankenstein, written by Lynn Fulton and illustrated by Felicita Sala

    Eerie ink-and-watercolor portraits help tell the tale of Shelley's Gothic creation.

     

    funeral

    The Funeral, written and illustrated by Matt James

    Multimedia illustrations lend some lightness to this sensitive portrayal of a difficult, important subject.

     

    ayobami

    Ayobami and the Names of the Animals, written by Pilar Lopez Avila and illustrated by Mar Azabal

     

    dreamers

    Dreamers, written and illustrated by Yuyi Morales (also available in Spanish)

    An autobiographical picture book about the author and her son's own experiences as newly arrived immigrants from Mexico (plus some extra library love!).

     

    florette

    Florette, written and illustrated by Anna Walker

    When Mae has to leave her home in the country and move to the city, she misses the greenery of her old life. But even in the city, nature—represented in brilliant, lush watercolors—has a way of helping her feel at home.

    ---

    Have trouble reading standard print? Many of these titles are available in formats for patrons with print disabilities.

    Staff picks are chosen by NYPL staff members and are not intended to be comprehensive lists. We'd love to hear your ideas too, so leave a comment and tell us what you’d recommend. And check out our Staff Picks browse tool for more recommendations!

     

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    Bob Knight won 3 NCAA basketball championships, an Olympic gold medal, and a total of 902 games. Nearly all of his players graduated from college. He coached for many different teams, with players of a variety of skill levels. The key to his long-standing success and basketball Hall of Fame status? Preparation, worry, and constantly striving to produce excellent work. Knight has never fallen prey to the lures of unbridled optimism.

    The Power of Negative Thinking book cover

    People tend to tell each other not to worry, that everything will be alright, that they will do better next time. However, inaction never produces superior results. People only improve when they develop and execute more effective strategies. Anxiety helps spur individuals to improve.

    In coaching basketball, Knight chose the unconventional approach of focusing on defensive maneuvers. Perhaps not the flashiest move, but this strategy has produced amazing results. He constantly asks his players what will happen if they do not engage in "X." He flips traditional wisdom on its head. He imparts in his students ways to think through plays he does not have to call constant time-outs. With careful planning and preparation, Bob Knight-coached teams have been able to consistently win in the ultra-competitive world of basketball in the United States and abroad.

    The Power of Negative Thinking: An Unconventional Approach to Achieving Positive Results by Bob Knight, 2013
     

    I love the focus this author has on realistic goal attainment.

    More on Bob Knight

    More books about basketball
     

     To Gold and Beyond book cover

    Laurie Hernandez was a dramatically energetic toddler. She could not stop running, leaping, and tumbling. When she was six years old, Hernandez saw a gymnastics event on TV and declared that she wanted to be in the Olympics. Her mother found her a gym and a movement class.

    Laurie loved the Excel gym, but was advancing faster than her classmates. She eventually had to pack up her things and move to a more intense, focused gym. By age eight, Laurie began homeschooling because she was traveling back and forth to Texas to train at the Karolyi ranch.

    Kids are groomed at a young age to be potential Olympic contenders. As a youngster, Laurie was chosen for the United States women national gymnastics team. At age 12, she became a junior elite gymnast, and was a senior elite gymnast at 16, the youngest age for that top category.

    Laurie's first international competition was in Japan, where she managed to perform alright, suffering from the sleep deprivation caused by the time change and the jitters associated with competing abroad. Apparently, securing a first international competition is only the harbinger of more opportunities to come for gymnasts. 

    In 2015, Laurie struggled with a leg injury that threatened to interfere with her ability to compete in the Rio Olympics in 2016. Not surprisingly, this tenacious girl persisted with the pursuit of her lifelong dream. Not only did she and four other girls make up one of the most culturally diverse women's gymnastics teams in history, they also secured a team gold medal in Brazil! Laurie also won a silver medal individually on the balance beam.

    Marta Karolyi insisted the girls stay focused on gymnastics at the Olympic community, and would not allow them to leave the grounds. The team even skipped the opening ceremony in order to preserve their energy for the competition. 

    Laurie was thrilled and elated to see her passion for the sport of gymnastics translated into the achievement of her dreams. She could not have been prouder to stand with her teammates—"The Final Five"—and receive accolades and medals for a fantastic performance in Rio de Janeiro. She loved trading pins with athletes from other countries and discussing their experiences in the Olympic cafeteria, which catered to many tastes and diets. Laurie was thrilled to be a part of something so big.

    Despite the struggles and impossibly difficult days when she feared she could not continue, either mentally or physically, Laurie got where she wanted to be.

    I Got This: To Gold and Beyond by Laurie Hernandez, 2017
     

    As a kid, I loved watching women's gymnastics and figure skating on TV. Their routines are so creative, artistic, beautiful, and amazing. Laurie has such a positive, optimistic attitude towards life and her favorite sport.

    More on Laurie Hernandez

    More books on gymnastics

     


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    Robert Zecker is an associate professor of history at Saint Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia. His teaching and research interests include immigration to the U.S., race and ethnicity, and urban history. His book, "A Road to Peace and Freedom": The International Workers Order and the Struggle for Economic Justice and Civil Rights, 1930-1954, published by Temple University Press in 2018, is the culmination of years of research and incorporates many resources found at The New York Public Library. All images within this post are from the Vito Marcantonio Papers, series III, boxes 45-47, from the NYPL Manuscripts and Archives Division.

    For those not familiar, please briefly introduce the subject of your study, the International Workers Order.

    Flyer stating May Day 1944, For Labor's Prisoners, with an image of various flagsZecker: The International Workers Order (IWO) was a consortium of left-wing ethnic self-insurance societies that was born in 1930 in the "languages division" of the Communist Party USA. The Order envisioned its mission as more capacious than writing accident and death policies and, at its height, enlisted more than 188,000 black, white, Hispanic, and Arabic members.
    The IWO was a militant champion of interracial solidarity, black civil rights, strong industrial unions, and rigorous social security programs for working-class Americans.

    I look at the activities the IWO pursued during the 1930s-1950s: why these activities landed them in trouble with the House Un-American Activities Committee and U.S. Justice Department; whether these activities really were a threat to U.S. security; and how the IWO defended itself against being labeled subversive.

    An advertisement to hear Congresman Vito Marcantonio in New York City

    Can you speak a bit about how you conducted your research, and what led you to NYPL’s archival holdings?

    Zecker: As I was finishing a previous book, I started reading about left-wing ethnic organizations such as the IWO, that resisted embracing whiteness at the expense of African Americans. I then started diving into various archives to see where I could find the papers of such organizations, reading a lot of material that eventually didn’t find its way into the book!

    At one point I did a lot of work at the New York Public Library looking at the issues of Labor Defender, which was the monthly magazine of the International Labor Defense, an organization that provided legal representation to union organizers and civil-rights activists.

    Congressman Vito Marcantonio was president of the ILD, as well as a vice president of the International Workers Order. Marcantonio was a tireless defender of labor and civil rights, and I was delighted to discover that the Vito Marcantonio papers are held at the NYPL’s Manuscripts and Archives Division.

    In looking through the organizational files in the Marcantonio papers here, I was surprised to see the names of so many prominent cultural figures on the letterheads—Rockwell Kent, for example.

    Zecker: Rockwell Kent was the president of the IWO following World War II. Kent was a painter, printmaker, and prolific artist in other media. The IWO sponsored workers’ schools and various recreational activities for its members, such as painting classes, sports teams, theater troupes and choirs, and mandolin orchestras, so it’s not surprising to discover a prominent artist such as Kent in the IWO.

    Marcantonio supported the IWO in its development of ethnic festivals and dance troupes, singing groups, etc., for its members. In his East Harlem congressional district, he often attended such IWO musical galas for Italian and "Spanish"—primarily Puerto Rican—members.

    Kent was an artist, but also a progressive. When he ran for Congress from upstate New York on the Progressive Party line in 1948, he proudly noted he was a member of three unions. Kent also noted his all-American, colonial Massachusetts pedigree, perhaps to counter anti-Communists’ stigmatization of the IWO as "foreign" and "un-American."

    Kent, as well as another prominent IWO member, African American actor-singer Paul Robeson, suffered for their activism and IWO membership. Both were denied passports by the State Department for eight years in the 1950s until the U.S. Supreme Court ruled, in Kent’s case, it was unconstitutional to deny a citizen a passport because of his political beliefs.

    Can you discuss further the IWO and how it was structured? How did Marcantonio work in tandem with the brotherhood in his role as a Congressman?

    Zecker: The IWO was a consortium of ethnic societies that eventually grew to number fifteen language branches. Many of its members were immigrants, so lodges often conducted meetings in Yiddish, Italian, Slovak, Spanish, and other languages. The Order also, however, recruited African American workers from its beginning and eventually a Lincoln-Douglass Society was founded for African American members.
    Detail of a rally flier, promoting the Lincoln and Garibaldi Battalions, held at Peter Stuyvesant High SchoolHowever, "English" lodges, for 2nd-generation white ethnics and other members, were established, too, and many such lodges had white and black members meeting in the same lodge. The Order had a national president and general secretary, but the language societies and the African American Lincoln-Douglass Society and "Spanish" Cervantes Society were granted a lot of autonomy.    

    When it was founded in 1930, the IWO brought together several pre-existing left-wing societies such as the Slovak Workers Society and the American Russian Fraternal Society. The IWO provided members with sickness, old-age, and death and burial insurance. At the time of its founding, there was no government program to aid the unemployed, aged, or destitute, so there was a real need.

    But from its beginning the IWO saw its mission as lobbying for more systemic changes. Foreign-language newspapers ran calls for new members that stressed the Order’s lobbying the government on "the struggle for unemployment, accident, sick, and old age insurance and death benefit."

    The IWO was fortunate to have an ally in Congress. Vito Marcantonio was the leader of the Order’s Garibaldi Society for Italian members, and worked in tandem with the Order lobbying for measures eventually enacted during the New Deal. The NYPL Marcantonio papers contain letters and petitions from IWO members urging him to demand more funding for Works Progress Administration (WPA) projects. Marcantonio was an advocate of universal health care, worker safety, and the extension of Social Security.

    In 1944 the IWO embraced Franklin Roosevelt’s call for a guarantee of the Four Freedoms and an economic Bill of Rights for all Americans. Consequently, the Order published a pamphlet by Marcantonio, "Security with FDR," which called for the president’s re-election and the implementation of further social-democratic measures.

    And although there were branches along ethnic lines, the IWO ultimately promoted multiculturalism.

    Zecker: The IWO celebrated the ethnic heritage of Slavic, Italian, and Jewish members, and also lauded the contributions African Americans and Hispanics made to the nation. White members sponsored events during Black History Week, and Slovak, Hungarian and other "ethnic" lodges often socialized with black and Hispanic IWO members at festivals, sporting events, camp outings, and theater evenings.

    Beyond advocating interracial socializing—itself anathema to many conservative Americans—the IWO campaigned for civil rights measures such as a federal anti-lynching bill, a permanent Fair Employment Practices Committee (FEPC), integration of the armed forces, an end to Jim Crow segregation of public facilities, and protection of black voting rights. In all of these campaigns, the IWO had a vocal ally in Marcantonio, whose unfashionable—for 1930-40s America—advocacy of racial equality is amply documented in the NYPL’s Marcantonio papers.

    The Baltimore Afro-American approvingly noted an IWO anti-discrimination rally and Marcantonio’s introduction of a bill barring discrimination in war work. Rubin Saltzman of the IWO’s Jewish section similarly demanded Army base recreational facilities be integrated.

    Hate mail written to Vito Marcantonio, dated July 28, 1940 Marcantonio also decried the wartime internment of Japanese Americans, for which he received letters of thanks from Nissei, including a letter from an internee that may have been dearest to his heart.

    "I believe that I am expressing the innermost feelings of all the 110,000 evacuees (90% of whom are citizens) in saying that we are greatly heartened and encouraged in the knowledge that you have the vision and courage to look at fundamental issues realistically," George Yoshioka wrote from a camp in Amache, Colorado, "and that you have taken steps to correct an unjust condition that has existed for these many years."

    Marcantonio proposed a bill to remove the bar on Asian naturalization, a move that earned him congratulations from the Japanese American Committee for Democracy. Letters in the NYPL Marcantonio papers, though, reveal that other white Americans did not appreciate Marcantonio and the IWO’s efforts. Letter-writers expressed fear of "race mixing" should the ban be lifted.

    It seems like the IWO’s radicalism played out not only in the political realms, but also in everyday life—such as the integration of baseball.

    ZA flyer stating End Jim Crow in Baseball Dayecker: The IWO afforded members a dizzying array of social activities; they created a kind of lived progressive milieu. Their own sports leagues were integrated, with black, white, and Hispanic baseball players competing in IWO leagues in places as varied as Los Angeles, Providence, Jersey City, and Canton, Ohio, as early as the 1930s. During these IWO games, petitions demanding the integration of the Major Leagues were passed through the stands. In other sporting events, fun, interracialism and radical identity mixed, too. The African American Chicago Defender publicized these tournaments.

    Both the IWO and Marcantonio would find themselves under government scrutiny in the post-war and 1950s.

    Zecker: The IWO was often in the crosshairs of various anti-Communist investigators. The House Un-American Activities Committee raided the Order’s Philadelphia offices in 1940, a seizure denounced by Marcantonio and later overturned by a federal judge. Marcantonio’s activities, while left-progressive, seemed to be protected even though the FBI continued to keep tabs on the congressman during the 1930s and ‘40s.

    Still, during World War II, "Marc" and his IWO comrades could laugh off the shenanigans of red-baiters such as HUAC Chairman Martin Dies. Marcantonio addressed the IWO’s 1944 convention in a speech frequently interrupted by "applause" and "laughter," predicting, "I hope that the day is not far off when I will not be the only member of Congress who is a member of the International Workers Order. In fact, I am confident… very soon there will be less Dieses, less Rankins, and more members of the IWO in the halls of Congress!"

    After World War II, Marc’s confidence may have been shaken. The FBI had already in 1941 recommended that this sitting congressman be rounded up in the event the FBI deemed there to be a national emergency warranting the establishment of security concentration camps. When the McCarran-Walter Act of 1950 provided for the establishment of internal detention lists and security detention camps, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover wanted Marcantonio placed on the list of those to be rounded up for detention. An assistant attorney general pointed out to Hoover that Marcantonio was still a sitting congressman.

    Within days of losing his seat in November 1950, though, Marcantonio was added to the list of security detainees; one of the marks against him in the FBI’s internal security memo was his attendance at an anti-lynching rally.

    Foreign-born IWO members were stripped of their citizenship and deported. Those IWO members who worked for government agencieseven the post officewere required to sign loyalty oaths. In 1951, the New York State Insurance Department used the IWO’s placement on the Attorney General’s List of Subversive Organizations as a pretext to strip the Order of its insurance license, declaring the IWO to be a "hazard." 

    New York State’s Supreme Court affirmed the liquidation order three years later. When the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear its appeal, the International Workers Order was disbanded. The IWO, with its bands, choirs, and militant advocacy of workers’ rights and racial justice was done.

    Also, in 1954, Vito Marcantonio, campaigning to reclaim his congressional seat, expired, succumbing to a heart attack on the campaign trail at age 52.

    Many of the social welfare and rights issues addressed by the IWO are still issues at large today. What lessons does the rise and fall of the organization have for 21st century America?


    Zecker: The IWO presents an example of an organization that resisted the dangerous call of Pamphlet for the Congress of Youth with the headline Calling the Citizens of Tomorrowwhite privilege. The members seem to have recognized that stigmatizing blacks or immigrants as intruders into America, or as those unfairly "taking" jobs or social benefits from "real" Americans, was a zero-sum game that would ultimately depress the living standards and working condition of all Americans.

    The common cause that white ethnics made with African Americans, Hispanics, and even Arab Americans may have been easier to envision in the 1930s and ‘40s than today, because even Slavic and Italian immigrants in that era were still often stigmatized as permanent outsiders. But the twinning of issues of racial justice and social-democratic economic advances by the IWO seems a timely reminder to avoid divide and conquer tactics or the dismissal of others’ causes. The IWO genuinely believed in interracialism, and even used the term "intersectionality" when referring to its activism on gender, racial and class issues, and this back in the 1930s.

    Advocacy of universal health care in the late 1930s and 1940s by the IWO seems like an issue whose time has come once again. Also, the story of the IWO demonstrates the enormity of the hurdles the group, or any group in our own day, has to overcome when confronting the surveillance state and a militarized national security state. The FBI files on the IWO, and on Marcantonio, reveal a panopticon of official spying on advocates of racial justice and unionized workers’ rights. The voluminous files on Marcantonio, and on the IWO as an organization, were tabulated decades before WikiLeaks, but they demonstrate how the security state has always tried to contain and limit democratic dissent. This is an ominous lesson for the 21st century.

    The anti-immigrant ethos behind much of the Red Scare of the 1940s and '50s, too, resonates with the current distressing official war on the foreign-born by ICE. It might be a lesson worth pondering by Slavic, Italian, and other white ethnic Americans that, 60 years ago, one’s own ancestors were characterized by officeholders and the media as the foreign menace polluting America.      

    More optimistically, the IWO did achieve gains that we now take for granted on economic rights as well as racial equality. Although IWO members were deported, and the organization liquidated, other IWO activists continued their work in the struggle for racial and class equality.

    --------------------------------------------------------------

    Marcantonio’s career in the IWO and Congress is vividly recounted in letters, speeches, papers, and other documents held at the NYPL. In addition to textual documents, the Vito Marcantonio papers also include photographs and sound recordings. All photographs depict material from the subjects' correspondence and papers series, boxes 45-47. This collection is supplemented by NYPL's rich database resources, such as the Communist Historical Newspapers Collection and the U.S. Declassified Documents Online, both of which are available online with an NYPL library card.


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    On November 9, 1989, the Berlin Wall fell, effectively and symbolically ending the Cold War. Twenty-five years later, we're still making sense of the decades of fear and east-west divisions. One need only watch FX's The Americans to see that the Cold War is still alive and well in the American imagination. As we look back at The Fall, here are the books we'll be reading.

    Cold War covers

    The Karla Trilogy Digital Collection Featuring George Smiley by John Le Carré
    You might call British intelligence agent George Smiley the "Anti-Bond." Neither handsome nor slick, he compensates with strategic brilliance.

    Iron Curtain by Anne Applebaum
    Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Anne Applebaum investigates how communism transformed Eastern Europe following World War II.

    The Sword and the Shield by Christopher M. Andrew
    What if the FBI found a treasure trove of KGB documents? In fact, they did, and the agency refers to it as their "most complete and extensive intelligence ever received."

    The Charm School by Nelson Demille
    A young American tourist discovers the secret KGB plot aimed at the American heartland.

    Spy Handler by Victor Cherkasin
    In this thrilling memoir, a former KGB officer tells the story of how he recruited two of America's most dangerous traitors, Robert Hanssen and Aldrich Ames.

    Comrade Jby Pete Earley
    Comrade J was the highest ranking official in the SVR, the agency that succeeded the KGB. He directed all Russian spies in New York City, oversaw covert operations against the U.S. and its allies, and secretly, turned double agent for the FBI.

    Iron Curtain: From Stage to Cold War by Patrick Wright
    The "iron curtain" didn't always evoke its current political meanings. In fact, it began as a theater term. This fascinating history reveals the term's rich life.

    The Cold War by John Lewis Gaddis
    Informed by newly opened Soviet, Eastern European, and Chinese archives, this history of the Cold War focuses on the strategic relationships that marked the era.

    Within the Context of No Context by George W.S. Trow
    A prescient look at American pop culture.

    Anthropology of an American Girl by Hilary Thayer Hamann
    A young artist in the 1970s and 1980s discovers her true passions and a longterm love for a professional boxer.


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    A library podcast about a book about libraries? Sign us up! Frank goes meta this week with an in-depth review of Susan Orlean's new page-turner, and Gwen sees an author of children's classics in a new light.

    library
    The Los Angeles Public Library -- pictured here ca. 1900 -- is on our minds, thanks to Susan Orlean's new book. Image from NYPL's Digital Collections, ID 2008805.

    Frank and Gwen's Recommendations

    The Library BookThe Orchid Thief, and several other books  by Susan Orlean

    Check out the Library Talks podcast (after Sunday, Nov. 11) to hear an interview with Orlean! 

    The works of Canadian children's author Robert Munsch:

    angela's airplane
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    How to listen to The Librarian Is In

    Subscribing to The Librarian Is In on your mobile device is the easiest way to make sure you never miss an episode. Episodes will automatically download to your device, and be ready for listening every other Thursday morning

    On your iPhone or iPad:
    Open the purple “Podcasts” app that’s preloaded on your phone. If you’re reading this on your device, tap this link to go straight to the show and click “Subscribe.” You can also tap the magnifying glass in the app and search for “The New York Public Library Podcast.”

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    Open the orange “Play Music” app that’s preloaded on your device. If you’re reading this on your device, click this link to go straight to the show and click “Subscribe.” You can also tap the magnifying glass icon and search for “The New York Public Library Podcast.” 

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    From a desktop or laptop:
    Click the “play” button above to start the show. Make sure to keep that window open on your browser if you’re doing other things, or else the audio will stop. You can always find the latest episode at nypl.org/podcast.


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    The U.S. Department of Labor is celebrating the fourth annual National Apprenticeship Week (NAW) November 12-18.  NAW offers leaders in business, labor, and education, and other critical partners, a chance to demonstrate their support for apprenticeship. NAW also gives apprenticeship sponsors the opportnity to showcase their programs, facilities, and apprentices in their community. The week-long event highlights the benefits of apprenticeship in preparing a highly skilled workforce to meet the talent needs of employers across diverse industries.

    Learn about National Apprenticeship Week.

    Employment Programs

    CUNY TechWorks and The Borough of Manhattan Community College Center for Continuing Education and Workforce Development are now offering qualified participants a "no-cost" 22-week computer training program in Computer Netwotk Support. As IT jobs continue to grow, the need for people to learn the latest technology and become certified as skilled professionals remains in high demand. To prepare for today's competitive workforce, students will go through a series of career development workshops in soft skills training, resume preparation, and mock interviews. Participants  will meet industry leaders and graduates of this program, who will share best practices on how to be successful in the IT field. Upon completion of the training, students can earn four college credits towards their associate's degree and graduates will be referred to jobs. The next session begins January 2019. Get more information here or call 212-346-8410 / 8420.

    Better Business Bureau (BBB) presents BBB Live X1: BBB invites bilingual volunteers to a Consumer Protection "Call-In" Program: Protecting Yourself from Work-at-Home Scams, Wednesday, November 14, 2018 at BBB Office, 30 East 33rd Street, 12th Floor, Manhattan. Volunteer for one or more of two call-answering shifts: 2 PM-7 PM and 3 PM-8 PM. Refreshments, resources, and training will be provided. Calls will be answered in Spanish, and each shift begins with training in English. It is especially important to have trained volunteers in place and ready to help callers from 5 PM to 7:30 PM, when most calls will come in. BBB is happy to work with volunteers on shift timing and length. For more information, please contact Luana Lewis at 212-358-2842 or email llewis@newyork.bbb.orgSee more details and sign up here.

    Apply for an Individual Training Grant (ITG). The grant pays for tuition, registration fees, testing fees, and books for in-demand trainings. ITGs are only available for training in certain occupations and at eligible training providers. Find out more about eligible occupations and training providers.

    ApprenticeNYC for CNC Machinists. ApprenticeNYC is a paid full-time apprenticeship opportunity that provides classroom-based technical training and on-the-job training to help New York City job seekers develop in-demand skills in a long-term occupation with high growth potential. The computer numerically controlled (CNC) machinist track of the program provides 10 weeks of classroom training and 62 weeks of on-the-job training with employers in the advanced manufacturing sector. No experience necessary. Complete this program application form to be considered for the opportunity.

    NYC Small Business Services work with the New York Alliance for Careers in Healthcare (NYACH), the city's healthcare industry partnership, and the Workforce 1 Healthcare Career Center, to offer no-cost training programs that prepare New Yorkers for jobs in the healthcare field. With NYACH, NYC Small Businesss Services engage employers, educational institutions, training providers, and other partners to design training programs that provide the required skills and credentials for viable healthcare career opportunities. Opportunites are available for those interested in ambulatory care and acute care. 

    The Borough of Manhattan Community College's Center for Continuing Education in partnership with the Manhattan Educational Opportunity Center is offering a free integrated English Language and Microsoft Excel Training Program.  The 15-week training will combine six hours of English language instruction each week with three hours of Microsoft Excel Certificate Training. Assistance with job readiness and resume preparation will be provided. Classes meet three days a week, 6 PM-9 PM, starting November 26, 2018. To register, please contact Rosa at 212-346-8895.

    School Professionals, the leading provider of substitute teachers for NYC Charter, Independent Parochial Schools, and Universal Pre-K, is currently seeking Teachers, Assistant Teachers, and Tutors for Pre-K through 12th grade. Qualified individuals will have a bachelor's degree or higher, and 6+ months of experience as a lead teacher, co-teacher, or tutor in a pre-K-12th grade setting. School Professionals is also seeking UPK Teachers, and Teacher Aides for Nursery and Preschool. Qualified individuals will have a high school diploma (or equivalent) or higher; 6+ months of experience as a lead teacher or teacher; 6+ months of experience as an afternoon teacher or assistant teacher, day care or summer camp counselor, or Sunday school teacher, or have similar experience working with children age 2-6 years.

    Chinese-American Planning Council's (CPC) Education and Career Services provide access to training and job opportunities to community members who are eager to enter the workforce. CPC matches your skills with the right opportunities and is now recruiting for their training programs, specifically the Foundation Customer Service Training Program. The training begins November 14, 2018 and will run for two-and-a-half weeks. Applicants for this class must be at least 18 years old, know how to use a computer, and possess excellent communication skills. Please attend one of the information sessions at CPC Brooklyn Community Center, 4101 8th Avenue, 4th floor, Brooklyn, NY 11220. For information, call 212-941-0041.

    The Staten Island Economic Development Corporation has launched the SI Works program to help industrial businesses fill open positions at their firms. 80+ open positions available include: CDL Driver, Mechanic, Graphic Designer, Installer/fabricator, Plumbing, Electrican, HVAC Technician, Auto Body, Welder, Accounting, Sales, Warehouse Associates, General Contractors, General Labor, Bookkeeper, and more. For immediate consideration, please email your resume to dawn@siedc.org.

    Henry Street Settlement's Intern and Earn (formerly known as Young Adult Internship Program) empowers young adults to connect to careers and grow in their professional pursuits. Internships available in child care, corporate, facilities, arts, fashion, retail, tech, and more. Must be 17-24 years old and not currently working or in school. Cohort begins November 26, 2018. Info sessions to start your application for the program are held Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 11 AM at 99 Essex Street, 3rd floor, New York, NY. For information, call 212-478-5400.

    Under the America's Promise CUNY TechWorks Program, Queensborough Community College (QCC) offers an Applied Software Development Training Program covering web client programming, systems design and implementation, and smartphone application development. This hands-on, tech skills training program culminates in a capstone application development class focused on building students' professional programming portfolios. Credits earned can be applied towards QCC's AAS degree in Information and Internet Technology. For more information, call 718-631-6343. 

    The Medical Administrative Assistant Training Program offered by Opportunities for a Better Tomorrow helps participants earn the Medical Administrative Assistant Certification from the National Healthcare Association and learn medical terminology, basic bookkeeping, communications, telephone techniques, and customer service. Participants will intern in medical offices and receive job placement assistance. Classes run Monday to Friday, 9 AM-4 PM. For more information, call (212) 630-9727.

    The CUNY Fatherhood Academy at LaGuardia Community College is now recruiting for the 16-week HSE prep program, which prepares fathers for the TASC exam and provides a range of academic and personal supports including tutoring, individualized counseling, financial literacy workshops, and parenting workshops. This free program is for unemployed and underemployed fathers between the ages of 18 and 30. For more information, get details here, or call 718-730-7336.

    CUNY LaGuardia TechHire - OpenCode program is an accelerated training in web development, software development, and networking administration to help young adults launch careers in high-growth, high-demand technology jobs.  Scholarships may be available for eligible young adults, aged 17-29. OpenCode students learn programming fundamentals, product development, and web development to prepare for jobs as front-end web developers. Classes will start February 2019. Apply now here.

    Brooklyn Networks is a free six-week training program that helps unemployed and underemployed individuals access careers in low-voltage cabling. The course prepares graduates to obtain the industry-recognized BICSI credential, followed by work in fields like voice and data cabling, security system installation, broadcast cabling, and A/V system installation. For more information, call 718-237-2017 x149 and find and attend an information session.

    Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation's (NMIC) YouthBuild: Business Bootcamp is a five-month training program for out-of-school young people. Services include High School Equivalency Diploma, Customer Service Certificate, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Certification (CPR), business plan creation with NYC Business Solutions, engaging in employment readiness training, and receiving job placement assistance. Open registration is held every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday beginning at 11:30 AM. Test begins at 12:45 PM. For more information, call 212-453-5369.

    The Cooper Union Retraining Program for Immigrant Engineers at CAMBA assists underemployed or unemployed immigrant engineers and IT professionals in gaining access to higher-paying  jobs through training and job placement assistance. The program includes night and weekend courses in information technology and chemical, mechanical, electrical, and civil engineering, taught by Cooper Union faculty and field experts. Since its inception in 1987, the Retraining Program for Immigrant Engineers has placed 3,000 immigrant engineers into careers.

    YearUp aligns job training with corporate partner needs and market trends to ensure that the skills students learn will be in demand. Learn valuable technical and professional skills, and gain work experience during internships at top companies. Earn a stipend throughout the program (while you train and during your internship) and complete courses eligible for college credits.

    Discover Accounting includes state-by-state guides on becoming a CPA, salaries, and educational requirements. If you are looking for more advanced accounting topics, you'll find information in their comprehensive career guide and career comparisons.

    New York City Career Center Events and Recruiting

    For specific information on all career events in NYC this week, please search the New York State Department of Labor Career Center Events.

    Brooklyn Mini Career Fair: Tuesday, November 13, 2018, 1 PM-4 PM at Brooklyn Workforce 1 Career Center, 250 Schermerhorn Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201. Participating businesses: AHRC, Block Institute. For information, call 718-780-9200.

    Job Search Planning  Workshop (English): Tuesday, November 13, 2018, 2 PM-4:15 PM at Bronx Workforce 1 Career Center, 400 East Fordham Road, 8th floor, Bronx, NY 10458. Participants will learn or improve job search skills that can  help in their job search process. Check-in time: 2:00 PM-2:15 PM. For information, call 718-960-7901.

    Benefits of Exploring Job Zone Workshop: Wednesday, November 14, 2018, 2 PM-4:15 PM at Bronx Workforce 1 Career Center, 400 East Fordham Road, 8th floor, Bronx, NY 10458. Participants will learn and explore how to use Job Zone, an interactive resource, to help manage their careers. Check-in time: 2:00 PM-2:15 PM. For information, call 718-960-7901.

    Bronx Mini Job Fair: Thursday, November 15, 2018, 1 0 AM- 1 PM at N ew York State Department of Labor , 400 E Fordham Rd., 7th floor, Bronx, NY 10458.  Participating businesses: Metropolitan Family Services.  For information call 718-613-3954.

    Individual Resume Review /Career Advisement: Thursday, November 15, 2018, 12:30 PM-3 PM at Bronx Workforce 1 Career Center, 400 East Fordham Road, 8th floor, Bronx, NY 10458. This session provides job seekers the opportunity to meet individually with a career advisor to discuss employment and training opportunities. Customers must arrive at the starting time, and then will be seen on a one-on-one basis as advisors become available. Check-in 12:30 PM-1:00 PM. For information, call 718-960-2458.

    Acing the Interview: Thursday, November 15, 2018, 1:30 PM-4:30 PM at Bronx Workforce 1 Career Center, 400 East Fordham Road, 8th floor, Bronx, NY 10458. This workshop will help job seekers prepare for interviews, demonstrate how to conduct oneself during an interview, and review the follow-up required to get a job. Duration: two-and-a-half hours. Check-in: 1:30 PM-2:00 PM. For information, call 718-960-2458.

    Basic Resume Writing Workshop: Thursday, November 15, 2018, 1:30 PM-3 PM at Brooklyn Workforce 1 Career Center, 250 Schermerhorn Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201. Participants will learn the purpose of a resume, and chronological and combination resumes, and select the appropriate type for their specific needs. For information, call 718-780-9200. 

    Dealing with Job Loss Workshop: Friday, November 16, 2018, 11 AM-1 PM at Brooklyn Workforce 1 Career Center, 250 Schermerhorn Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201.  Attendees will discuss the job loss stages of grief, do a self-assessment exercise, and express their feelings. For more information, call 718-780-9200.

    Job Postings and AssistanceJob Fair Sign-up Table

    Job Postings at New York City Workforce 1.

    Apprenticeship Opportunities in New York City.

    Available jobs via Brooklyn Community Board 14.

    The New York City Employment and Training Coalition (NYCE&TC) is an association of 200 community-based organizations, educational institutions, and labor unions that annually provide job training and employment services to over 750,000 New Yorkers, including welfare recipients, unemployed workers, low-wage workers, at-risk youth, the formerly incarcerated, immigrants and the mentally and physically disabled. View NYCE&TC Job Listings.

    Digital NYC is the official online hub of the New York City startup and technology ecosystem, bringing together every company, startup, investor, event, job, class, blog, video, workplace, accelerator, incubator, resource, and organization in the five boroughs. Search jobs by category on this site.

    St. Nicks Alliance Workforce Development provides free job training and educational programs in Environmental Response and Remediation Tec (ERRT), Commercial Driver's License, Pest Control Technician Training (PCT), Employment Search, Prep Training and Job Placement, Earn Benefits, and Career Path Center. For information and assistance, please visit St. Nicks Alliance Workforce Development or call 718-302-2057 ext. 202.

    Brooklyn Workforce Innovations helps jobless and working poor New Yorkers establish careers in sectors that offer good wages and opportunities for advancement. Currently, BWI offers free job training programs in four industries: commercial driving, telecommunications cable installation, TV and film production, and skilled woodworking.

    CMP (formerly Chinatown Manpower Project) in lower Manhattan is now recruiting for free training in Quickbooks, Basic Accounting, and Excel. This training is open to anyone receiving food stamps but no cash assistance. Classes run for eight weeks, followed by one-on-one meetings with a job developer.

    CMP also provides Free Home Health Aide Training for bilingual English/Cantonese speakers receiving food stamps but no cash assistance. Training runs Mondays through Fridays for six weeks, and includes test prep and the HHA certification exam. Students learn about direct care techniques such as taking vital signs, and assisting with personal hygiene and nutrition.

    For more information on the above CMP training programs, email info@cmpny.org, call 212-571-1690, or visit the CMP website. CMP also provides tuition-based healthcare and business training free to students who are entitled to ACCESS funding.

    Nontraditional Employment for Women (NEW) trains women, and places them in careers in the skilled construction, utility, and maintenance trades. It helps women achieve economic independence and a secure future. For information call 212-627-6252, or register online.

    Grace Institute provides tuition-free, practical job training in a supportive learning community for underserved New York area women of all ages, and from many different backgrounds. For information, call 212-832-7605.
     

    Please note that this page will be revised when more recruitment events for the week of November 11 become available.


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    Illustration of a girl reading on a rocket in space, holding a book that entitled "Knowledge is Power"El universo literario es ciertamente ilimitable. Afortunadamente, la lectura puede iluminar nuestro espacio intelectual infinitamente con el valioso poder del conocimiento. Esta breve lista selectiva de libros recientes ofrece un popurrí de temas de espiritualidad y autoayuda, con otros entretenidos de ciencia ficción para disfrutar de la temporada del Día de Acción de Gracias leyendo aquí ¡o quizás en otras galaxias!

    Actitud positiva - cubierta - book cover

    Actitud positiva... ¡Y a las pruebas me remito!, los estudios científicos lo demuestran: la mejor solución a tus problemas es mantener una buena actitud ante la vida

    Lozano, César

    El doctor César Lozano ofrece lecciones de vida para aprender a sobrellevar las tensiones laborales y personales y lograr un estilo de vida saludable.

     

    Artemisa - cubierta - book cover

    Artemisa

    Weir, Andy

    Es esta historia de ciencia ficción, Jazz habita en la rica ciudad de la luna, pero debe vivir del contrabando para poder aumentar sus pobres ingresos, y luego de cometer el crimen que parecía perfecto, se ve inesperadamente envuelta en una conspiración de alto rango.

     

     

     

    Como el secreto cambio mi vida - cubierta - book cover

    Cómo el secreto cambió mi vida: gente real, historias reales

    Byrne, Rhonda

    La destacada autora de El secreto. ofrece por primera vez una recopilación de inspiradoras historias. 

     


     

    Contra las estrellas - cubierta - book cover

    Contra la estrellas

    Gray, Claudia

    Después de un ataque sorpresa, Noemi, un soldado, y Abel, un robot enemigo, quedan perdidos en el espacio y ambos emprenden una búsqueda interestelar para salvar su planeta Génesis, una antigua colonia de la Tierra.

     


     

    Estados Unidos de Japon - cubierta - book cover

    Estados Unidos de Japón

    Liu, Peter Tieryas

    En esta trama de ciencia ficción, Japón rige a los Estados Unidos después de ganar la segunda guerra mundial, y el gobierno japonés va en busca de la captura de unos posibles traidores que intentan avivar el espíritu patriótico a través de un peligroso sistema de videojuego.

     



     

    Hijos de hombre - cubierta - book cover

    Hijos de hombres

    James, P. D.

    En esta trama de ciencia ficción donde los seres humanos dejan de procrear y la raza humana está en peligro de extinción, un grupo de jóvenes se organiza para desafiar al gobierno totalitario conocido como el Guardián. La película está basada en esta obra.

     

     

     

    Imagen, actitud y poder - cubierta - book cover

    Imagen, actitud y poder

    Lara, Lucy

    “Has que tu estilo y personalidad trabajen por ti.”

     

     



     

    Risoterapia - cubierta - book cover

    Risoterapia

    Thalmann, Yves-Alexandre,

    "Mejora tu vida gracias a la risa y al buen humor."

     

     

     


     

    Las trampas de la felicidad - cubierta - book cover

    Las trampas de la felicidad

    Massé Blume, Eduardo

     “Las 9 transformaciones para la ciencia del bienestar integral”

     

     

     


     

    Vivir bien la vida - cubierta - book cover

    Vivir bien la vida: los beneficios inesperados del fracaso y la importancia de la imaginación

    Rowling, J. K.

    Anécdotas de la destacada escritora de la popular serie de Harry Potter presentan su punto de vista de la vida.


    Algunas de estas obras también pueden estar disponibles en diferentes formatos. Para más información, sírvase comunicarse con el bibliotecario de su biblioteca local. Para información sobre eventos, favor de visitar: Eventos en Español. Más Blog en Español. Síganos por ¡Twitter


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    Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts

     

    Susan Orlean and The Library Book

    More than 30 years after a fire destroyed 400,000 books at the Los Angeles Public Library's Central Library,  journalist Susan Orlean re-examines the tragedy in The Library Book. Orlean has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1992; her quest to piece together the events surrounding this little-known tale was fueled by her relentless curiosity, a love of reading, and a profound appreciation for the democratic institution of the library. "Libraries are remembering for a whole culture," she said, describing the sorrow at such an indescribable loss of so many books. "That's what books do for all of us—preserve memory."

     
    Click here to find out how to subscribe and listen to the Library Talks podcast.

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    The Library's current periodicals collection covers a wide range of subjects, from the social sciences to general interest to popular culture. One intriguing category of periodicals revolves around collectibles—the publications may not be considered mainstream but strike a chord with many enthusiasts.

    Collectible Items of Interest

    Clocks Magazine coverClocks magazine

    The focus is on antique and modern clocks with detailed and informative articles. The magazine includes interviews and auctions.



     

    Pen World magazine coverPen World

    This magazine features vintage and new pens, along with accessories, from all over the world; includes how-to guides, and reviews.


     

    It’s a Small World… Tiny Toy Collectibles

    Old Toy Solider magazine coverOld Toy Soldier

    Diehard collectors will find information on shows, auctions, and book reviews, with wide-ranging and intriguing articles on toy soldiers.


     

    Miniature Wargames magazine coverMiniature Wargames

    Wargaming enthusiasts will enjoy this magazine, covering topics ranging from historical games to "steampunk role-playing." The magazine includes reviews and battle maps.



     

    Who Knew This Was a Thing?!: Odd Collectibles

    The Check Collector magazine coverThe Check Collector

    This magazine for collectors and historians has unique articles and images pertaining to checks and check collecting, from the 19th century to the present. Readers will enjoy browsing the member exchange section.

     

    The Doorknob Collector magazine coverThe Doorknob Collector

    This quarterly newsletter covers preservation and historical articles, and includes want ads and convention listings.

           
     

    The Printed Word

    Fine Books & Collections magazine coverFine Books & Collections

    Calling all hardcore book lovers! Topics include maps and manuscripts, book events, exhibits, and auctions, with an extensive resource guide.


     

    Uppercase magazine coverUppercase

    For those interested in typography, designs and patterns, this is a publication to explore.
     

     

     

    Old-Time Favorites

    Dolls magazine coverDolls

    This is a must for folks who collect dolls and doll accessories. The magazine highlights everything from vintage antiques to ethnic dolls, and includes a calendar of events for the United States.



     

    Teddy Bear & Friends magazine coverTeddy Bear & Friends

    This magazine features articles on "bear basics" and bear-making. Readers can also participate in the annual public choice awards.


     

    It’s In the Cards

    Barr's Post Card News and Ephemera magazine coverBarr's Post Card News and Ephemera

    Readers will find a treasure trove of postcard-related news, images, special features, and upcoming shows and events.


     

    Beckett Sports Card Monthly magazine coverBeckett Sports Card Monthly

    Sports fans will certainly enjoy this publication, whether they collect cards or just general sports memorabilia.


     

    People sitting at library tables in a room with a high ceiling, a chandelier, and arched windows
    NYPL DeWitt Wallace Periodicals Room


    This is just a small sample of our current periodicals collection. Please explore our catalog and come spend a few hours of pleasure reading here at the Library's DeWitt Wallace Periodicals Room.

     


       


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    It’s been more than a decade since the last Harry Potter book was released in the United States.

    Related properties have tried to fill the void—the publication and stage production of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, the Hogwarts Mystery game, the Fantastic Beasts franchise—but there’s just nothing like a magical book.

    potter books

    So, here are a few new suggestions for stories that are enchanting in their own right, and that might give you a bit of that magical buzz. Middle-grade fiction for kids comes first, and the rest is a blend of YA and adult fiction. All of these were published within the last few years; check out our 2016 Harry Potter readalike post for earlier picks.

    If You Want Magical Series for the Pre-Teens in Your Life…

    school good evil

    The School for Good and Evil by Soman Chainani
    What if instead of teaching wizards and witches, a magical school taught kids to be the heroes and villains in fantasticals fairy tales?  

    pennyroyal

    Pennyroyal Academy by M.A. Larson
    Witches are the enemy at this magical school—and so are dragons, which threaten the safety of the kingdom.
     

    serpent

    The Serpent’s Secret by Sayantani DasGupta
    Influenced by Bengali folktales, this funny and exciting story traces the journey of Kiran to the Kingdom Beyond Seven Oceans and Thirteen Rivers to rescue her parents. Only the first book in this series is out so far, but stay tuned—it deserves a serious fan base.
     

    fairy tales

    "True story" fairy tale retellings by Liesel Shurtliff
    The heroes of your favorite fairy tales—Red (as in, Riding Hood); Rump (as in, Rumplestiltskin); Jack (as in, “and the beanstalk”)—come alive.
     

    If You Want More about Magic and Wizards…

    sorcerer

    Sorcerer to the Crown series by Zen Cho
    Race, class, and gender take center stage in this historical fantasy, set in a 19th-century England where a new Sorcerer Royale, himself a freed slave, can’t stop the drain on the country’s magical supply. That’s women’s work, and Prunella Gentleman steps up with a plan to refresh the dwindling stores.

     

    unkindness

    An Unkindness of Magicians by Kat Howard
    Everyone knows that New York City is magic. But in this fantastical page-turner, its magic is fading fast, and only one magician understands how to stop the darkness from taking over. (Adult)

     

    queen of the tearling

    The Queen of the Tearling  by Erika Johansen
    Magic during an apocalypse?  This is the first book in a trilogy that flips back and forth in time, weaving fantastical elements into royal politics and a dystopian mystery.

    If You Want More Young Heroes Saving the World…

    markswoman

    Markswoman by Rati Mehrotra
    Check out a different Chosen One: Kyra, a Markswoman in the Order of Kali. She’s the only person to survive after everyone in her village is killed, and now she’s poised to lead her elite sisterhood.
     

    city of brass

    The City of Brass by S.A. Chakraborty
    Nahri—the hero of this fantasy, full of action and adventure—knows she’s more of a trickster than a real magician. But when an enigmatic djinn shows up and reveals the new world of a legendary city, Nahri needs to decide how (and whether) to wield magic for herself.
     

    forest

    Forest of a Thousand Lanterns by Julie C. Dao
    Xifeng will stop at nothing to fulfill her destiny as the empress of Feng Lu, including sacrificing herself. (One of NYPL’s Best Books for Teens in 2017!)

    If You Want More Really Absorbing Fantasy…

    spinning

    Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik
    Miryem is a good foil for Harry—a reluctant hero with the weight of her world on her shoulders. Loosely based on Rumplestiltskin myth, this story about a Jewish girl who can turn silver to gold is also somehow about poverty, class, gender, abuse, and a freezing parallel universe with the creepiest citizens since the White Walkers. (And if you’ve never read Uprooted, which is another step away from Harry Potter but still amazing, go forth!)
     

    forest queen

    The Forest Queen by Betsy Cornwell
    Another woman-centered retelling of a well-known classic. In this Robin Hood take-off, Lady Silviana of Loughsley bands together with a group of strong women to fight back against her brother, who’s just become the sheriff.
     

    nyxia

    Nyxia by Scott Reintgen
    So, this one might be a little closer to Hunger Games than Harry Potter, but we can’t resist including it because of Emmett Atwater—the protagonist of the story, who’s part of a gang of teens sent to a new planet to mine a dangerous mieral—and the strong supporting characters fighting against him and backing him up. The sequel, Nyxia Unleashed, came out earlier this year; watch for the third book in the trilogy in 2019.
     

    queen

    The Queen’s Rising by Rebecca Ross
    Students at Magnalia House study the five passions: art, music, dramatics, wit, and knowledge. Brienna chooses knowledge, but when she accepts the patronage of a mysterious man determined to bring a rightful queen back to power, she’s thrown into the middle of a complicated political intrigue.

    Thanks to YA expert Susen Shi for her amazing suggestions!

    Photo from Flickr user Hung Chieh Tsai.

    ---

    Have trouble reading standard print? Many of these titles are available in formats for patrons with print disabilities.

    Staff picks are chosen by NYPL staff members and are not intended to be comprehensive lists. We'd love to hear your ideas too, so leave a comment and tell us what you’d recommend. And check out our Staff Picks browse tool for more recommendations.


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